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Abstract

This article reviews social science research on women's rights, corruption, and immigration in Russia. Intentionally diverse, our selection of topics illustrates how the same three analytical lenses have been applied across a broad range of scholarship on the postcommunist world. Each lens is bifocal and entails a tension between two extremes. The victims versus agents lens refers to a tendency of scholars to portray their subjects either as passive victims of macrostructural and cultural conditions or as agents who adapt to survive, or even thrive, despite significant challenges. The similar versus exotic lens pits the assumption that Russia is a modern European country against the view that it is too distinctive to be meaningfully compared with the West or analyzed with Western theories. Finally, the old versus new lens represents competing views on the extent to which the institutional, cultural, and structural legacies of the Soviet Union, perestroika, and the 1990s continue to shape Russian society. The broad goal of our review is to highlight the intellectual promise of studying Russia sociologically.

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2021-07-31
2024-06-23
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