1932

Abstract

Over the past two decades, a growing body of research has focused on immigrant selectivity and its effects on immigrant health, immigrant labor market outcomes, and children of immigrants’ educational outcomes. This review provides a theoretical overview of immigrant selectivity and its effects, and critically examines research on the effects of immigrant selectivity. Existing research suggests that positive immigrant selectivity helps explain paradoxical patterns of success among immigrants and their children in health, the labor market, and education. However, future research is needed that uses more rigorous research designs and measures, links immigrant selectivity and outcomes across domains, identifies the mechanisms through which immigrant selectivity matters, and considers different types of immigrant selectivity. I conclude by highlighting promising new studies along these lines and argue that immigrant selectivity is a central part of the process through which immigration contributes to inequality.

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2020-07-30
2024-04-14
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