1932

Abstract

The market selection hypothesis states that, among expected utility maximizers, competitive markets select for agents with correct beliefs. In some economies this hypothesis holds, whereas in others it fails. It holds in complete-markets economies with a common discount factor and bounded aggregate consumption. It can fail when markets are incomplete, when consumption grows too quickly, or when discount factors and beliefs are correlated. These insights have implications for the general equilibrium modeling of asset prices and macroeconomic phenomena.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.economics.102308.124403
2010-09-04
2024-04-15
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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