1932

Abstract

Abstract

The formation of an arterial aneurysm is believed to be a multifactorial and predominantly degenerative process, resulting from a complex interplay between biological processes in the arterial wall and the hemodynamic stimuli on the vessel's wall. Once an aneurysm forms, the repetitive pressure and shear stresses exerted by the blood flow on the weakened arterial wall generally, but not always, cause a gradual expansion. As the wall geometry, composition, and strength progressively degrade through the enlargement process, the aneurysm ruptures when the wall of the distended artery fails to support the stresses resulting from the internal blood flow. This review surveys recent progress in this area and provides a critical assessment of the contribution made by hemodynamics studies to the current understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and to its clinical management.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.fluid.39.050905.110128
2007-01-21
2024-06-13
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.fluid.39.050905.110128
Loading
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.fluid.39.050905.110128
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Article Type: Review Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error