1932

Abstract

Abstract

Waterbells result from the impact of a low-viscosity liquid jet (diameter , velocity ) on a solid surface (characteristic length ) of similar size (). Their stationary shape mainly results from the equilibrium between inertia and surface tension. When closed, this shape becomes sensitive to the pressure difference that occurs across the sheet and the bell can become unstable or exhibit stationary cusps. We first review the work done on the shape and stability of waterbells, and then address the case of “special bells,” like swirling bells, polygonal bells, and reverse bells. Finally, we discuss the singular limit of the “flat bell” or liquid sheet.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.fluid.39.050905.110317
2007-01-21
2024-04-13
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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