1932

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection occurs in an estimated one quarter of HIV-infected persons in Europe, Australia, and the United States. As use of highly active antiretroviral drugs has markedly reduced opportunistic infections, HCV-related liver disease has emerged as a leading cause of death. HIV infection adversely affects both the natural history and the treatment of hepatitis C. Because there are no experimental models of coinfection and because the pathogenesis of each infection is incompletely understood, how HIV infection alters hepatitis C is not clear. This review considers the epidemiology, natural history, treatment, and pathogenesis of hepatitis C in HIV-infected persons.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.med.59.081906.081110
2008-02-18
2024-06-21
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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