1932

Abstract

The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) represents the largest group of secondary active membrane transporters, and its members transport a diverse range of substrates. Recent work shows that MFS antiporters, and perhaps all members of the MFS, share the same three-dimensional structure, consisting of two domains that surround a substrate translocation pore. The advent of crystal structures of three MFS antiporters sheds light on their fundamental mechanism; they operate via a single binding site, alternating-access mechanism that involves a rocker-switch type movement of the two halves of the protein. In the -glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) from , the substrate-binding site is formed by several charged residues and a histidine that can be protonated. Salt-bridge formation and breakage are involved in the conformational changes of the protein during transport. In this review, we attempt to give an account of a set of mechanistic principles that characterize all MFS antiporters.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.micro.61.080706.093329
2008-10-13
2024-04-20
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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