1932

Abstract

Members of the phylum are obligate intracellular bacteria that were discovered about a century ago. Although are major pathogens of humans and animals, they were long recognized only as a phylogenetically well-separated, small group of closely related microorganisms. The diversity of chlamydiae, their host range, and their occurrence in the environment had been largely underestimated. Today, several chlamydia-like bacteria have been described as symbionts of free-living amoebae and other eukaryotic hosts. Some of these environmental chlamydiae might also be of medical relevance for humans. Their analysis has contributed to a broader understanding of chlamydial biology and to novel insights into the evolution of these unique microorganisms.

Keyword(s): amoebachlamydiaevolutionsymbiosis
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.micro.62.081307.162818
2008-10-13
2024-06-15
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Supplementary Data

  • Article Type: Review Article
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