1932

Abstract

Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) are the newest generation of lab-on-a-chip devices and have made significant strides in both our understanding of fundamental behavior and performance characteristics and expansion of their applications. μPADs have become useful analytical techniques for environmental analysis in addition to their more common application as medical point-of-care devices. Although the most common method for device fabrication is wax printing, numerous other techniques exist and have helped address factors ranging from solvent compatibility to improved device function. This review highlights recent reports of fabrication and design, modes of detection, and broad applications of μPADs. Such advances have enabled μPADs to be used in field and laboratory studies to address critical needs in fast, cheaper measurement technologies.

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2020-06-12
2024-06-13
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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