1932

Abstract

In this review, we summarize recent advances in nanoscale electrochemistry, including the use of nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials, and nanowires. Exciting developments are reported for nanoscale redox cycling devices, which can chemically amplify signal readout. We also discuss promising high-frequency techniques such as nanocapacitive CMOS sensor arrays or heterodyning. In addition, we review electrochemical microreactors for use in (drug) synthesis, biocatalysis, water treatment, or to electrochemically degrade urea for use in a portable artificial kidney. Electrochemical microreactors are also used in combination with mass spectrometry, e.g., to study the mimicry of drug metabolism or to allow electrochemical protein digestion. The review concludes with an outlook on future perspectives in both nanoscale electrochemical sensing and electrochemical microreactors. For sensors, we see a future in wearables and the Internet of Things. In microreactors, a future goal is to monitor the electrochemical conversions more precisely or ultimately in situ by combining other spectroscopic techniques.

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2018-06-12
2024-04-14
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