1932

Abstract

Mass spectrometry is the science and technology of ions. As such, it is concerned with generating ions, measuring their properties, following their reactions, isolating them, and using them to build and transform materials. Instrumentation is an essential element of these activities, and analytical applications are one driving force. Work from the Aston Laboratories at Purdue University's Department of Chemistry is described here, with an emphasis on accelerated reactions of ions in solution and small-scale synthesis; ion/surface collision processes, including surface-induced dissociation (SID) and ion soft landing; and applications to tissue imaging. Our special interest in chirality and the chemistry behind the origins of life is also featured together with the exciting area of tissue diagnostics.

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2018-06-12
2024-04-21
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