1932

Abstract

The sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to the local atomic-scale environment offers great potential for the characterization of a diverse range of solid materials. Despite offering more information than its solution-state counterpart, solid-state NMR has not yet achieved a similar level of recognition, owing to the anisotropic interactions that broaden the spectral lines and hinder the extraction of structural information. Here, we describe the methods available to improve the resolution of solid-state NMR spectra and the continuing research in this area. We also highlight areas of exciting new and future development, including recent interest in combining experiment with theoretical calculations, the rise of a range of polarization transfer techniques that provide significant sensitivity enhancements, and the progress of in situ measurements. We demonstrate the detailed information available when studying dynamic and disordered solids and discuss the future applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy across the chemical sciences.

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2018-06-12
2024-04-16
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