1932

Abstract

The development of wearable devices provides approaches for the realization of self-health care. Easily carried wearable devices allow individual health monitoring at any place whenever necessary. There are various interesting monitoring targets, including body motion, organ pressure, and biomarkers. An efficient use of space in one small device is a promising resolution to increase the functions of wearable devices. Through integration of a microfluidic system into wearable devices, embedding complicated structures in one design becomes possible and can enable multifunction analyses within a limited device volume. This article reviews the reported microfluidic wearable devices, introduces applications to different biofluids, discusses characteristics of the design strategies and sensing principles, and highlights the attractive configurations of each device. This review seeks to provide a detailed summary of recent advanced microfluidic wearable devices. The overview of advanced key components is the basis for the development of future microfluidic wearable devices.

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2023-06-14
2024-06-14
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