1932

Abstract

Measurement of humoral factors secreted from cells has served as an indispensable method to monitor the states of a cell ensemble because humoral factors play crucial roles in cell–cell interaction and aptly reflect the states of individual cells. Although a cell ensemble consisting of a large number of cells has conventionally been the object of such measurements, recent advances in microfluidic technology together with highly sensitive immunoassays have enabled us to quantify secreted humoral factors even from individual cells in either a population or a temporal context. Many groups have reported various miniaturized platforms for immunoassays of proteins secreted from single cells. This review focuses on the current status of time-resolved assay platforms for protein secretion with single-cell resolution. We also discuss future perspectives of time-resolved immunoassays from the viewpoint of systems biology.

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2020-06-12
2024-06-24
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