1932

Abstract

Single particle tracking (SPT) has proven to be a powerful technique in studying molecular dynamics in complicated systems. We review its recent development, including three-dimensional (3D) SPT and its applications in probing nanostructures and molecule-surface interactions that are important to analytical chemical processes. Several frequently used 3D SPT techniques are introduced. Especially of interest are those based on point spread function engineering, which are simple in instrumentation and can be easily adapted and used in analytical labs. Corresponding data analysis methods are briefly discussed. We present several important case studies, with a focus on probing mass transport and molecule-surface interactions in confined environments. The presented studies demonstrate the great potential of 3D SPT for understanding fundamental phenomena in confined space, which will enable us to predict basic principles involved in chemical recognition, separation, and analysis, and to optimize mass transport and responses by structural design and optimization.

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2020-06-12
2024-06-17
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