1932

Abstract

This review examines the discourses and practices that have produced a lively literature on museum decolonization created by scholars of museum practices and curators. We consider the trajectory of decolonization efforts in museums, focusing especially on the care of Native North American heritage, with comparison to similar trajectories internationally. We begin with a discussion of decolonizing moments in theory and practice, with particular attention to 1990s critique of ethnographic museums and developments after the passage of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). Following this discussion is a review of works on concerns regarding Native American representation and public displays, involvement in collections care, and the varied collaborations that are changing museum practices. The final section foregrounds the fluorescence of tribal museums and their contributions to the decolonization and indigenization of museums, as well as emerging paradigm shifts in both the anthropology of museums and anthropology in museums.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-052721-040652
2023-10-23
2024-04-23
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/anthro/52/1/annurev-anthro-052721-040652.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-052721-040652&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Literature Cited

  1. Ames MM. 1986. Museums, the Public, and Anthropology: A Study in the Anthropology of Anthropology Vancouver: Univ. B. C. Press
  2. Ames MM. 1992. Cannibal Tours and Glass Boxes: The Anthropology of Museums Vancouver: Univ. B. C. Press
  3. Anderson J. 2005. Access and Control of Indigenous Knowledge in Libraries and Archives: Ownership and Future Use New York: Am. Libr. Assoc., MacArthur Found.
  4. Anderson J, Christen K. 2013. ‘Chuck a copyright on it’: dilemmas of digital return and the possibilities for traditional knowledge licenses and labels. Mus. Anthropol. Rev. 7:1–2105–26
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Anderson J, Montenegro M 2017. Collaborative encounters in digital cultural property: tracing temporal relationships of context and locality. The Routledge Companion to Cultural Property J Anderson, H Geismar 431–51. London: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Archambault J. 2011. Native communities, museums and collaboration. Pract. Anthropol. 33:216–20
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Atalay S. 2012. Community-Based Archaeology: Research With, By, And For Indigenous and Local Communities Berkeley: Univ. Calif. Press
  8. Bell JA. 2015. The veracity of form: transforming knowledges and their forms in the Purari Delta of Papua New Guinea. See Silverman 2015 105–22
  9. Bell JA. 2022. Making kin: rawness, porosity, and the agencies. Mus. Anthropol. 45:172–79
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Berk CD. 2022. Tasmanian aboriginal material culture, compensation, belonging. Mus. Anthropol. 45:115–27
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Bernstein B. 1992. Collaborative strategies for the preservation of North American Indian material culture. J. Am. Inst. Conserv. 31:123–29
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Blackhawk N, Sutton S. 2019. Spaces for expression: art and knowledge-sharing at the Native American Cultural Center. Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art KN McCleary 37–47. New Haven, CT: Yale Univ Art Gallery
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Blackhawk N, Wilner IL. 2018. Indigenous Visions: Rediscovering the World of Franz Boas New Haven, CT: Yale Univ. Press
  14. Boas F. 1907. Some principles of museum administration. Science 25:650921–33
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Boast R. 2011. Neocolonial collaboration: museum as contact zone revisited. Mus. Anthropol. 34:156–70
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Boast R, Enote J. 2013. Virtual repatriation: It is neither virtual nor repatriation. Heritage in the Context of Globalization: Europe and the Americas PF Biehl, C Prescott 103–13. New York: Springer
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Bodo S, Gibbs K, Sani M, eds 2009. Museums as Places for Intercultural Dialogue: Selected Practices from Europe Dublin: MAP for ID Group
  18. Bolles AL, Gomberg-Muñoz R, Perley BC, Brondo KV. 2022. Anthropological Theory for the Twenty-First Century: A Critical Approach Toronto: Univ. Tor. Press
  19. Bookman A, Morgen S, eds 1988. Women and the Politics of Empowerment Philadelphia: Temple Univ. Press
  20. Brown AK, Peers L. 2003. Museums and Source Communities: A Routledge Reader London: Taylor & Francis Group
  21. Bruchac MM. 2010. Lost and found: NAGPRA, scattered relics, and restorative methodologies. Mus. Anthropol. 33:2137–56
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Bruchac MM. 2018. Savage Kin: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists Tucson: Univ. Ariz. Press
  23. Cabrera R. 2006. Beyond the museum walls. Mus. News 85:435–38
    [Google Scholar]
  24. CAMA (Counc. Aust. Mus. Assoc.) 1993. Previous Possessions, New Obligations. Policies for Museums in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Melbourne: CAMA
  25. Carattini A, Walsh M. 2015. Contemporary perspectives: in, out, and around museums. Pract. Anthropol. 37:34–6
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Chavez Lamar C, Racette SF, Evans L, eds 2010. Art in Our Lives: Native Women Artists in Dialogue Santa Fe, NM: Sch. Adv. Res. Press
  27. Chipangura N. 2018. Working with contested ethnographic collections to change “old museum” perspectives: Mutare Museum, Eastern Zimbabwe, 2015–2017. Martor. Rev. Anthropol. Mus. Paysan Roum. 23:59–69
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Clapperton JA. 2010. Contested spaces, shared places: The Museum of Anthropology at UBC, Aboriginal peoples, and postcolonial criticism. BC Stud. Br. Columbian Q. 165:7–30
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Clavir M. 2002. Heritage preservation: museum conservation and First Nations perspectives. Ethnologies 24:233–45
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Clifford J. 1997. Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press
  31. Clifford-Napoleone AR. 2013. A new tradition: a reflection on collaboration and contact zones. J. Mus. Educ. 38:2187–92
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Cohen N. 1988. Omaha Indian music: historic recordings from the Fletcher/La Flesche collection. J. Am. Folk. 101:401345–47
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Colwell-Chanthaphonh C, Nash SE. 2012. A future for museum anthropology!. Mus. Anthropol 35:297–100
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Colwell-Chanthaphonh C, Piper J. 2001. War and cultural property: the 1954 Hague Convention and the status of US ratification. Int. J. Cult. Prop. 10:2217–45
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Cooper KC. 2007. Spirited Encounters: American Indians Protest Museum Policies and Practices Lanham, MD: AltaMira
  36. Deloria EC. 1998. Speaking of Indians Lincoln: Univ. Neb. Press
  37. Deloria PJ. 2018. The new world of the Indigenous museum. Daedalus 147:2106–15
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Deloria V Jr. 1969. Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto New York: Macmillan
  39. Duggan BJ. 2011. Introducing partnered collaborations into a Native American gallery project in a state museum. Pract. Anthropol. 33:228–34
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Echo-Hawk RC, Echo-Hawk WR 1994. Battlefields and Burial Grounds: The Indian Struggle to Protect Ancestral Graves in the United States Minneapolis, MN: Lerner
  41. Fienup-Riordan A. 1999. Collaboration on display: a Yup'ik Eskimo exhibit at three national museums. Am. Anthropol. 101:2339–58
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Fowler Williams L, Wierzbowski W, Preucel RW, eds 2005. Native American Voices on Identity, Art, and Culture: Objects of Everlasting Esteem Philadelphia: Univ. Pa. Mus. Archaeol. Anthropol.
  43. Gilchrist S, Skerritt H. 2016. Awakening objects and indigenizing the museum: Stephen Gilchrist in conversation with Henry F. Skerritt. Contemporaneity Hist. Presence Vis. Cult. 5:108–21
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Glass A. 2015. Indigenous ontologies, digital futures: plural provenances and the Kwakwaka'wakw collection in Berlin and beyond. See Silverman 2015 19–44
  45. Greene C. 2016. Material connections: “the Smithsonian Effect” in anthropological cataloguing. Mus. Anthropol. 39:2147–62
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Gupta A, Stoolman J. 2022. Decolonizing US anthropology. Am. Anthropol. 124:4778–99
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Haas J. 1996. Power, objects, and a voice for anthropology. Curr. Anthropol. 37:1S1–22
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Hall S 1997. Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices London: Sage
  49. Harrison FV. 2011. Decolonizing Anthropology: Moving Further toward an Anthropology for Liberation Arlington, VA: Am. Anthropol. Assoc. , 3rd ed..
  50. Harrison J. 1993. Completing a circle: the spirit sings. Anthropology, Public Policy and Native Peoples in Canada N Dyck, JB Waldram 334–58. Montreal: McGill-Queens
    [Google Scholar]
  51. Harrison R, Byrne S, Clarke A, eds 2013. Reassembling the Collection: Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous Agency. Santa Fe, NM: Sch. Adv. Res. Press
  52. Haskin W, Nash SE, Coleman S. 2003. A chronicle of field museum anthropology. Fieldiana. Anthropol. 2003. 36:65–81
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Hays-Gilpin K, Lomatewama R 2013. Curating communities at the Museum of Northern Arizona. Reassembling the Collection: Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous Agency R Harrison, S Byrne, A Clarke 259–84. Santa Fe, NM: Sch. Adv. Res. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Hollinger RE, John E Jr, Jacobs H, Moran-Collins L, Thome C et al. 2013. Tlingit-Smithsonian collaborations with 3D digitization of cultural objects. Mus. Anthropol. Rev. 7:1–2201–53
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Hooper-Greenhill E. 2000. Museums and the Interpretation of Visual Culture London: Routledge
  56. Hymes D 1972. Reinventing Anthropology New York: Pantheon
  57. Isaac G. 2007. Mediating Knowledges: Origins of a Zuni Tribal Museum Tucson, AZ: Univ. Ariz. Press
  58. Jacknis I 2019. No object without its story: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the creation of a Native material anthropology. Disruptive Voices and the Singularity of Histories R Darnell, FW Gleach 231–52. Lincoln: Univ. Neb. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  59. Janes RR. 2009. Museums in a Troubled World: Renewal, Irrelevance or Collapse? London: Routledge
  60. Janes RR. 2022. The value of museums in averting societal collapse. Curator Mus. J 65:4729–45
    [Google Scholar]
  61. Jobson CC. 2020. The case for letting anthropology burn: sociocultural anthropology in 2019. Am. Anthropol. 122:2259–71
    [Google Scholar]
  62. Johnson TR, Nagel J, Champagne D, eds 1997. American Indian Activism: Alcatraz to the Longest Walk Urbana: Univ. Ill. Press
  63. Jones DJ. 1970. Towards a native anthropology. Hum. Organ. 29:4251–59
    [Google Scholar]
  64. Jorgensen M. 2012. Sustaining Indigenous Culture: The Structure, Activities, and Needs of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums Oklahoma City, OK: Assoc. Trib. Arch. Libr. Mus.
  65. Joyce R. 2022. Some academics hesitate to repatriate Indigenous remains. Here's why. Washington Post Oct. 26. https://www.washingtonpost.com/made-by-history/2022/10/26/universities-indigenous-remains/
    [Google Scholar]
  66. Karp I, Kreamer CM, Lavine SD. 1992. Museums and Communities: The Politics of Public Culture Washington, DC: Smithson. Inst. Press
  67. Karp I, Lavine SD, eds 1991. Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display Washington, DC: Smithson. Inst. Press
  68. Kemnitzer LS. 1997. Personal memories of Alcatraz, 1969. See Johnson et al. 1997 113–18
  69. Kidwell CS. 1985. Native knowledge in the Americas. Osiris 1:209–28
    [Google Scholar]
  70. King L. 2017. Legible Sovereignties: Rhetoric, Representations, and Native American Museums Corvallis: Or. State Univ. Press
  71. Kirshenblatt-Gimblett B. 1998. Destination Culture: Tourism, Museums, and Heritage Berkeley: Univ. Calif. Press
  72. Knell SJ. 2004. Museums and the Future of Collecting. London: Routledge. , 2nd ed..
  73. Kreps C 2016. The real and the ideal: towards culturally appropriate and collaborative heritage practice in Kalimantan. Borneo Studies in History, Society and Culture VT King, Z Ibrahim, NH Hassan 211–34. Singapore: Springer Singapore
    [Google Scholar]
  74. Kreps CF. 2003. Liberating Culture: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Museums, Curation, and Heritage Preservation London: Routledge
  75. Kreps CF. 2020. Museums and Anthropology in the Age of Engagement London: Routledge
  76. Krmpotich C. 2014. The Force of Family: Repatriation, Kinship, and Memory on Haida Gwaii Toronto: Univ. Tor. Press
  77. Krmpotich C 2020. The senses in museums: knowledge production, democratization and indigenization. The Routledge Handbook of Sensory Archaeology R Skeates, J Day 94–106. London: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  78. La Flesche FL 1913. The Omaha tribe. Science 37:965982–83
    [Google Scholar]
  79. Lawlor M. 2006. Public Native America: Tribal Self-Representations in Casinos, Museums, and Powwows New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers Univ. Press
  80. Lonetree A. 2006. Continuing dialogues: evolving views of the National Museum of the American Indian. Public Hist 28:257–62
    [Google Scholar]
  81. Lonetree A. 2012. Decolonizing Museums: Representing Native America in National and Tribal Museums Chapel Hill: Univ. N. C. Press
  82. Macdonald S 2011. A Companion to Museum Studies Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell
  83. Marstine J 2006. New Museum Theory and Practice: An Introduction Malden, MA: Blackwell
  84. McCleary KN, Shrestinian LT. 2019. Entangled pasts, collaborative futures: reimagining Indigenous North American Art at Yale. Place, Nations, Generations, Beings: 200 Years of Indigenous North American Art17–35. New Haven, CT: Yale Univ. Art Gallery
    [Google Scholar]
  85. McFarlane DE. 2022. Representing Blackness: The Marcus Mosiah Garvey Multimedia Museum AL Bolles Kingston, Jam: Univ. West Indies Press
  86. McIntyre D, Wehner K, eds 2001. Negotiating Histories: National Museums. Conference Proceedings Canberra: Natl. Mus. Aust.
  87. Medicine B. 1999. Ella Cara Deloria: Early Lakota ethnologist (newly discovered novelist). Theorizing the Americanist Tradition LP Valentine, R Darnell 259–67. Toronto: Univ. Tor. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  88. Mihesuah DA 2000. Repatriation Reader: Who Owns American Indian Remains? Lincoln: Univ. Neb. Press
  89. Mullings L. 1997. On Our Own Terms: Race, Class, and Gender in the Lives of African-American Women London: Routledge
  90. Murphy E, Black S. 2022. New hall, new paths: hall revisualization leads to renovated practice Presented at the 2022 American Institute for Conservation (AIC) Annual Meeting, Los Angeles May (Abstr.)
  91. Murphy EE, Passerotti N, Hornbeck SE. 2021. Dismantling antiquated practices at the Field Museum: stakeholders, challenges, and solutions Presented at the 13th North American Textile Conservation Conference online, Oct 25–29
  92. Nash SE, Colwell C. 2020. NAGPRA at 30: the effects of repatriation.. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 49:225–39
    [Google Scholar]
  93. Nichols CA, Lowman CB. 2018. A common thread: recognizing the contributions of the Summer Institute in museum anthropology to graduate training with anthropological museum collections. Mus. Anthropol. 41:5–12
    [Google Scholar]
  94. Onciul B. 2015. Museums, Heritage and Indigenous Voice: Decolonising Engagement New York: Routledge
  95. Phillips RB. 2011. Museum Pieces: Toward the Indigenization of Canadian Museums Montreal: McGill-Queens Univ. Press
  96. Powell TB. 2014. The American Philosophical Society: protocols for the treatment of indigenous materials. Proc. Am. Philos. Soc. 158:4411–12
    [Google Scholar]
  97. Pratt ML. 1991. Arts of the contact zone. Profession 1991.33–40
  98. Price S. 1989. Primitive Art in Civilized Places Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
  99. Ravesloot JC. 1989. Communication and cooperation between the Arizona State Museum and Native Americans. Mus. Anthropol. 13:37–10
    [Google Scholar]
  100. Rideout HM. 1912. William Jones, Indian, Cowboy, American Scholar, and Anthropologist in the Field New York: Frederick A. Stokes
  101. Rosaldo MZ, Lamphere L. 1974. Woman, Culture, and Society Redwood City, CA: Stanford Univ. Press
  102. Sandell R, Nightingale E. 2012. Museums, Equality and Social Justice London: Routledge
  103. Sanders N, Roelstraete D, eds 2020. Apsáalooke Women and Warriors Chicago: Neubauer Coll.
  104. Sauvage A. 2010. To be or not to be colonial: museums facing their exhibitions. Rev. Cult. 6:1297–116
    [Google Scholar]
  105. Schott KA, Quinones R. 2021. Steps towards decolonizing a museum: sharing diverse voices. Expedition 63:158–59
    [Google Scholar]
  106. Schuller M. 2021. Humanity's Last Stand. Confronting Global Catastrophe New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  107. Shannon J. 2017. Collections care informed by Native American perspectives: teaching the next generation. Collections 13:3–4205–23
    [Google Scholar]
  108. Shannon JA. 2014. Our Lives: Collaboration, Native Voice, and the Making of the National Museum of the American Indian Santa Fe, NM: Sch. Adv. Res. Press
  109. Silverman RA 2015. Museum as Process: Translating Local and Global Knowledges London: Routledge
  110. Simpson A. 2011. Settlement's secret. Cult. Anthropol. 26:2205–17
    [Google Scholar]
  111. Simpson MG. 1996. Making Representations: Museums in the Post-Colonial Era New York: Routledge
  112. Srinivasan R, Becvar KM, Boast R, Enote J. 2010. Diverse knowledges and contact zones within the digital museum. Sci. Technol. Hum. Values 35:5735–68
    [Google Scholar]
  113. Sully D. 2007. Decolonizing Conservation: Caring for Maori Meeting Houses Outside New Zealand. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press
    [Google Scholar]
  114. TallBear K. 2019. Caretaking relations, not American dreaming. Kalfou 6:124–41
    [Google Scholar]
  115. Tayac G 2009. IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas Washington, DC: Smithson. Books
  116. Thorner SG. 2022. Being called to action: contemporary museum ethnographies. Mus. Anthropol. 45:13–14
    [Google Scholar]
  117. Thorsgard M. 2008. Cultural Resource Laws and the Representation of Native Americans in Museums: A Cross Cultural Comparison Saarbrücken, Ger: VDM
  118. Trope JF, Echo-Hawk WR 1992. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act: background and legislative history. Ariz. State L. J. 24:35
    [Google Scholar]
  119. Tuhiwai Smith LT 2012. Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples London: Zed Books. , 2nd ed..
  120. Turner H. 2022. Absence and presence in museum anthropology. Mus. Anthropol. 45:93–95
    [Google Scholar]
  121. van Broekhoven LNK, Buijs C, Hovens P. 2010. Sharing Knowledge & Cultural Heritage: First Nations of the Americas. Studies in Collaboration with Indigenous Peoples from Greenland, North and South America. Proceedings of an Expert Meeting National Museum of Ethnology Leiden, the Netherlands Leiden, Neth: Sidestone
  122. VanStone JW. 1998. Mesquakie (fox) material culture: the William Jones and Frederick Starr Collections. Fieldiana. Anthropol. 1998.301–89
    [Google Scholar]
  123. Wali A. 2015. Centering culture in museum work/centering the museum in culture work. Pract. Anthropol. 37:324–25
    [Google Scholar]
  124. Wali A 2020. Community destruction, museum collections and the work of resilience. Cultural Violence and the Destruction of Human Communities. New Theoretical Perspectives F Greenland, FM Göçek 143–67. New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  125. Wali A, Cabrera R, Anderson J. 2012. Museum anthropology. Oxford Bibliographies On-Line J Jackson. https://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/display/document/obo-9780199766567/obo-9780199766567-0053.xml
    [Google Scholar]
  126. Wali A, Tudor M 2017. Crossing the line: participatory action research in a museum setting. Public Anthropology in a Borderless World S Beck, CA Maida 66–88. New York: Berghahn Books. , 1st ed..
    [Google Scholar]
  127. Well-Off-Man M, Fricke S, Herr C, eds 2020. Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future Santa Fe, NM: IAIA Mus. Contemp. Indian Arts
  128. West WR Jr. 2016. Native America in the twenty-first century: journeys in cultural governance and museum interpretation. Museums, Ethics and Cultural Heritage BL Murphy 278–88. New York: Routledge. , 1st ed..
    [Google Scholar]
  129. Wrightson KR. 2017. The limits of recognition: The Spirit Sings, Canadian museums and the colonial politics of recognition. Mus. Anthropol. 40:136–51
    [Google Scholar]
  130. Yohe JA, Greeves T, eds 2019. Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists Seattle: Univ. Wash. Press
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-052721-040652
Loading
  • Article Type: Review Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error