1932

Abstract

Archaeological evidence of human-influenced transformations of physical strata and the Earth system provides strong support to the broad concept of the Anthropocene, yet it also presents a powerful material challenge to some of its most entrenched assumptions. This substantial and growing body of time-transgressive evidence has the potential to radically alter the concept from the ground up and to provide a literal ground on which interdisciplinary collaboration among the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities can take place.

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2021-10-21
2024-06-24
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