1932

Abstract

Discussions of boundaries have enjoyed a renaissance in anthropological archaeology of recent years, especially as conversations surrounding forced migration and border walls look toward the material record for clarification about what borders are and what they do. Since 1995, when the last addressed a similar issue, numerous methodological and conceptual changes in the field have led to a large proliferation in the literature. By framing this review around the work of boundaries, I signal two trends in the field of archaeology with conceptual and methodological implications. The first trend is the increased centrality of materiality as a theoretical register as new questions relating to object agency, human/nonhuman boundaries, and new models of environmental archaeology have populated the literature. In such climates it is important to focus on boundaries as a kind of assemblage of actants that takes on agencies beyond notions of territory. Associated border, crossing, transnational, and refuge assemblages are discussed. The second trend is the increased attention to boundary work in archaeology. In this article I review one thread of that literature, critical cartographies, and how they have used the archaeological record to develop radical renditions of political space where boundaries are involved. I focus on scholarship surrounding the relatively recent past (ca. 1200 CE to the present).

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-101819-110141
2022-10-24
2024-04-21
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/anthro/51/1/annurev-anthro-101819-110141.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-101819-110141&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Literature Cited

  1. Abel S, Schroeder H. 2020. From country marks to DNA markers: the genomic turn in the reconstruction of African identities. Curr. Anthropol. 61:S198–209
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Acabado S. 2017. The archaeology of pericolonialism: responses of the “unconquered” to Spanish conquest and colonialism in Ifugao, Philippines. Int. J. Hist. Archaeol. 21:1–26
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Acabado S. 2018. Zones of refuge: resisting conquest in the northern Philippine highlands through environmental practice. J. Anthropol. Archaeol. 52:180–95
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Agbe-Davies AS. 2022. African American archaeology, for now. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 51:345–63
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Agorsah EK. 1994. Maroon Heritage: Archaeological, Ethnographic, and Historical Perspectives Barbados: Canoe Press
  6. Al-Houdalieh SH, Bernbeck R, Pollock S. 2017. Palestinian looted tombs and their archaeological investigation. J. East. Mediterr. Archaeol. Herit. Stud. 5:198–239
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Alconini S. 2008. Dis-embedded centers and architecture of power in the fringes of the Inka empire: new perspectives on territorial and hegemonic strategies of domination. J. Anthropol. Archaeol. 27:63–81
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Alconini S. 2016. Southeast Inka Frontiers: Boundaries and Interactions Gainesville: Univ. Press Fla.
  9. Anderson M. 1996. Frontiers: Territory and State Formation in the Modern World Cambridge, UK: Polity Press
  10. Atalay S. 2006. No sense of the struggle: creating a context for survivance at the NMAI. Am. Indian Q. 30:597–618
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Barnes TJ. 2008. Geography's underworld: the military-industrial complex, mathematical modelling and the quantitative revolution. Geoforum 39:3–16
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Barry TB. 1987. The Archaeology of Medieval Ireland London: Routledge:
  13. Battle-Baptiste W. 2017. Black Feminist Archaeology London: Routledge
  14. Bender B. 2001. Landscapes on-the-move. J. Soc. Archaeol. 1:75–89
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Benn Torres J, Martucci V, Aldrich MC, Vilar MG, MacKinney T et al. 2019. Analysis of biogeographic ancestry reveals complex genetic histories for indigenous communities of St. Vincent and Trinidad. Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 169:482–97
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Bernardini W, Fowles S 2011. Becoming Hopi, becoming Tiwa: two Pueblo histories of movement. Movement, Connectivity, and Landscape Change in the Ancient Southwest M Nelson, C Strawhacker 253–74 Boulder: Univ. Press Colo.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Bernbeck R. 2010. Imperialist networks: ancient Assyria and the United States. Present Pasts 2:1)
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Bloch L. 2016. An elemental approach to the distribution of lead-glazed coarse earthenware in the eighteenth-century Chesapeake. Am. Antiq. 81:231–52
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Brewster A, Byrd B, Reddy S. 2003. Cultural landscapes of coastal foragers: an example of GIS and drainage catchment analysis from Southern California. J. GIS Archaeol. 1:46–60
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Brighton SA. 2009. Historical Archaeology of the Irish Diaspora: A Transnational Approach Knoxville: Univ. Tenn. Press
  21. Bunge WW. 1971. Fitzgerald: Geography of a Revolution Cambridge, MA: Schenkman Publishing Co.
  22. Byrne D. 2016. Counter-mapping in the archaeological landscape. Handbook of Landscape Archaeology B David, J Thomas 609–16 London: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Cameron CM. 2013. How people moved among ancient societies: broadening the view. Am. Anthropol. 115:218–31
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Camp SMH. 2002.. “ I could not stay there”: enslaved women, truancy and the geography of everyday forms of resistance in the antebellum plantation South. Slavery Abolit 23:1–20
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Chase AF, Chase DZ, Fisher CT, Leisz SJ, Weishampel JF. 2012. Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology. PNAS 109:12916–21
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Cobb CR. 2014. The once and future archaeology. Am. Antiq. 79:589–95
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Cobb CR, DePratter CB. 2012. Multisited research on colonowares and the paradox of globalization. Am. Anthropol. 114:446–61
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Cosgrove DE. 1983. Towards a radical cultural geography: problems of theory. Antipode 15:1–11
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Craig J. 2021. Refining the chronology and distribution of mid-fifteenth to mid-seventeenth century Indian Ocean world glass. Antiquity 95:e35
    [Google Scholar]
  30. d'Alpoim Guedes J, Gonzalez S, Rivera-Collazo I 2021. Resistance and care in the time of COVID-19: archaeology in 2020. Am. Anthropol 123:898–915
    [Google Scholar]
  31. De León J. 2012.. “ Better to be hot than caught”: excavating the conflicting roles of migrant material culture. Am. Anthropol. 114:477–95
    [Google Scholar]
  32. De León J. 2015. The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail Berkeley: Univ. Calif. Press
  33. Deagan K. 2007. Eliciting contraband through archaeology: illicit trade in eighteenth-century St. Augustine. Hist. Archaeol. 41:98–116
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Douglass K, Cooper J. 2020. Archaeology, environmental justice, and climate change on islands of the Caribbean and southwestern Indian Ocean. PNAS 117:8254–62
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Dunnavant JP. 2021. Have confidence in the sea: maritime maroons and fugitive geographies. Antipode 53:884–905
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Dussubieux L, Walder H. 2015. Identifying American native and European smelted coppers with pXRF: a case study of artifacts from the Upper Great Lakes region. J. Archaeol. Sci. 59:169–78
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Ferguson J, Gupta A. 2002. Spatializing states: toward an ethnography of neoliberal governmentality. Am. Ethnol 29:981–1002
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Fernandes DM, Sirak KA, Ringbauer H, Sedig J, Rohland N et al. 2021. A genetic history of the pre-contact Caribbean. Nature 590:103–10
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Fischer C, Hsieh E. 2017. Export Chinese blue-and-white porcelain: compositional analysis and sourcing using non-invasive portable XRF and reflectance spectroscopy. J. Archaeol. Sci. 80:14–26
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Flewellen AO. 2017. Locating marginalized historical narratives at Kingsley Plantation. Hist. Archaeol. 51:71–87
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Flewellen AO, Odewale A, Dunnavant J, Jones A, White W. 2021. Creating community and engaging community: the foundations of the Estate Little Princess Archaeology Project in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands. Int. J. Hist. Archaeol. 26:147–76
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Fowles SM. 2013. An Archaeology of Doings: Secularism and the Study of Pueblo Religion Santa Fe, NM: SAR Press
  43. Franklin M, Dunnavant JP, Flewellen AO, Odewale A. 2020. The future is now: archaeology and the eradication of anti-Blackness. Int. J. Hist. Archaeol. 24:753–66
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Funari PPA 2003. Maroon, race and gender: Palmares material culture and social relations in a runaway settlement. Historical Archaeology: Back from the Edge PPA Funari, M Hall, S Jones 328–47 London: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Gentelli L. 2019. Enhancing understanding of the emergence of global trade: analysis of 17th- to 19th-century Spanish coins recovered from Western Australian shipwrecks using laser ablation – inductively coupled plasma – mass spectrometry (LA–ICP–MS). Archaeometry 61:701–19
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Gieryn TF. 1983. Boundary-work and the demarcation of science from non-science: strains and interests in professional ideologies of scientists. Am. Sociol. Rev. 48:781–95
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Gokee C, Stewart H, De León J. 2020. Scales of suffering in the US-Mexico borderlands. Int. J. Hist. Archaeol. 24:823–51
    [Google Scholar]
  48. González-Ruibal A. 2008. Time to destroy: an archaeology of supermodernity. Curr. Anthropol. 49:247–79
    [Google Scholar]
  49. González-Tennant E. 2016. Recent directions and future developments in geographic information systems for historical archaeology. Hist. Archaeol. 50:24–49
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Greenblatt S, Županov I, Meyer-Kalkus R, Paul H, Nyíri P, Pannewick F. 2009. Cultural Mobility: A Manifesto Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
  51. Gustas R, Supernant K. 2017. Least cost path analysis of early maritime movement on the Pacific Northwest Coast. J. Archaeol. Sci. 78:40–56
    [Google Scholar]
  52. Haines JJ. 2021. Shaping landscapes: environmental history, plantation management and colonial legacies in Mauritius. Int. J. Hist. Archaeol. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10761-021-00629-0
    [Crossref] [Google Scholar]
  53. Hall M. 2000. Archaeology and the Modern World: Colonial Transcripts in South Africa and the Chesapeake London: Routledge224 pp .
  54. Hamilakis Y. 2016. Archaeologies of forced and undocumented migration. J. Contemp. Archaeol 3:121–39
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Hamilakis Y. 2019. Planet of camps: border assemblages and their challenges. Antiquity 93:1371–77
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Hamilakis Y. 2022. Border assemblages between surveillance and spectacle: What was Moria and what comes after?. Am. Anthropol. 124:212–20
    [Google Scholar]
  57. Harley J. 2002. The New Nature of Maps: Essays in the History of Cartography. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press
  58. Harmon JM, Leone MP, Prince SD, Snyder M. 2006. LiDAR for archaeological landscape analysis: a case study of two eighteenth-century Maryland plantation sites. Am. Antiq. 71:649–70
    [Google Scholar]
  59. Harris K. 2019. A hard kind of freedom: land labor and material culture in post-emancipation Dominica PhD Thesis Northwestern Univ. Evanston, IL:
  60. Harris LM, Hazen HD. 2005. Power of maps: (counter) mapping for conservation. Int. J. Crit. Geogr. 4:99–130
    [Google Scholar]
  61. Harrower MJ. 2016. Water Histories and Spatial Archaeology: Ancient Yemen and the American West Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
  62. Hartnett A, Dawdy SL. 2013. The archaeology of illegal and illicit economies. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 42:37–51
    [Google Scholar]
  63. Hauser MW. 2011. Routes and roots of empire: pots, power, and slavery in the 18th-century British Caribbean. Am. Anthropol. 113:431–47
    [Google Scholar]
  64. Hauser MW. 2021. Mapping Water on Dominica: Environment and Enslavement Under Colonialism Seattle: Univ. Wash. Press
  65. Hauser MW, Armstrong D 2012. The archaeology of not being governed: a counterpoint to a history of settlement of two colonies in the eastern Caribbean. J. Soc. Archaeol. 12:310–33
    [Google Scholar]
  66. Hauser MW, Battle-Baptiste W, Lau-Ozawa K, Voss BL, Bernbeck R et al. 2018. Archaeology as bearing witness. Am. Anthropol. 120:535–48
    [Google Scholar]
  67. Hawthorne C. 2019. Black matters are spatial matters: Black geographies for the twenty-first century. Geogr. Compass 13:e12468
    [Google Scholar]
  68. Hicks D, Mallet S. 2019. Lande: The Calais ‘Jungle’ and Beyond Bristol, UK: Policy Press
  69. Ho E. 2004. Empire through diasporic eyes: a view from the other boat. Comp. Stud. Soc. Hist. 46:210–46
    [Google Scholar]
  70. Hofman CL, Borck L, Laffoon JE, Slayton ER, Scott RB et al. 2020. Island networks: transformations of inter-community social relationships in the Lesser Antilles at the advent of European colonialism. J. Island Coast. Archaeol. 16:290–316
    [Google Scholar]
  71. Horning AJ. 2006. Archaeology, conflict and contemporary identity in the north of Ireland. Implications for theory and practice in comparative archaeologies of colonialism. Archaeol. Dialogues 13:183–200
    [Google Scholar]
  72. Hulme P 2007. Meditation on Yellow: trade and indigeneity in the Caribbean. Economies of Representation, 17902000: Colonialism and Commerce L Dale, H Gilbert 3–16 London: Ashgate Publ.
    [Google Scholar]
  73. Hunt D, Stevenson SA. 2017. Decolonizing geographies of power: Indigenous digital counter-mapping practices on Turtle Island. Settl. Colon. Stud. 7:372–92
    [Google Scholar]
  74. Jackson SE, Wright J, Brown LA. 2019. Countermapping the past: reenvisioning ancient Maya spaces at Say Kah, Belize. Nor. Archaeol. Rev. 52:109–36
    [Google Scholar]
  75. Jakes AF, Jones PF, Paige LC, Seidler RG, Huijser MP. 2018. A fence runs through it: a call for greater attention to the influence of fences on wildlife and ecosystems. Biol. Conserv. 227:310–18
    [Google Scholar]
  76. Jatt ZR, Riggs EP. 2021. Propinquity through dwelling: living in evacuee properties after the partition of India and Pakistan. J. Soc. Archaeol. 21:74–96
    [Google Scholar]
  77. Kantner J 2004. Geographical approaches for reconstructing past human behavior from prehistoric roadways. Spatially Integrated Social Science MF Goodchild, DG Janelle 323–44 Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  78. Kersel MM. 2007. Transcending borders: objects on the move. Archaeologies 3:81–98
    [Google Scholar]
  79. Khalaf N, Insoll T. 2019. Monitoring Islamic archaeological landscapes in Ethiopia using open source satellite imagery. J. Field Archaeol. 44:401–19
    [Google Scholar]
  80. Kintigh KW, Altschul JH, Beaudry MC, Drennan RD, Kinzig AP et al. 2014. Grand challenges for archaeology. Am. Antiq 79:5–24
    [Google Scholar]
  81. Klesner CE, MacDonald BL, Dussubieux L, Akymbek Y, Vandiver PB. 2019. Local production and long-distance trade of Islamic glazed ceramics in Central Asia: A compositional analyses of ceramics from Southern Kazakhstan by NAA and LA-ICP-MS. J. Archaeol. Sci. Rep. 26:101905
    [Google Scholar]
  82. Klingelhofer E. 2010. Castles and Colonists: An Archaeology of Elizabethan Ireland Manchester, UK: Manchester Univ. Press
  83. Kosiba S, Hunter RA. 2017. Fields of conflict: a political ecology approach to land and social transformation in the colonial Andes (Cuzco, Peru). J. Archaeol. Sci. 84:40–53
    [Google Scholar]
  84. Kwan M-P. 2002. Feminist visualization: re-envisioning GIS as a method in feminist geographic research. Ann. Assoc. Am. Geogr 92:645–61
    [Google Scholar]
  85. Laffoon JE, Ramos RR, Baik LC, Storde YN, Lopez MR et al. 2014. Long-distance exchange in the precolonial circum-Caribbean: a multi-isotope study of animal tooth pendants from Puerto Rico. J. Anthropol. Archaeol. 35:220–33
    [Google Scholar]
  86. Lafrenz Samuels K. 2016. Transnational turns for archaeological heritage: from conservation to development, governments to governance. J. Field Archaeol. 41:355–67
    [Google Scholar]
  87. Laroche CJ. 2014. The Geography of Resistance: Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad Urbana: Univ. Ill. Press
  88. Larrain , McCall MK. 2019. Participatory mapping and participatory GIS for historical and archaeological landscape studies: a critical review. J. Archaeol. Method Theory 26:643–78
    [Google Scholar]
  89. Lasaponara R, Masini N. 2007. Detection of archaeological crop marks by using satellite QuickBird multispectral imagery. J. Archaeol. Sci. 34:214–21
    [Google Scholar]
  90. Lightfoot KG, Martinez A. 1995. Frontiers and boundaries in archaeological perspective. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 24:471–92
    [Google Scholar]
  91. Lilley I 2007. Diaspora and identity in archaeology: moving beyond the Black Atlantic. A Companion to Social Archaeology L Meskell, RW Preucel 287–312 Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
    [Google Scholar]
  92. Liverani M. 1988. The growth of the Assyrian Empire in the Habur/Middle Euphrates area: a new paradigm. State Arch. Assyria/Bull 2:81–98
    [Google Scholar]
  93. Llobera M. 2007. Reconstructing visual landscapes. World Archaeol 39:51–69
    [Google Scholar]
  94. Lynch K. 1964. The Image of the City. Boston: MIT Press
  95. MacEachern S. 2010. Seeing like an oil company's CHM programme: Exxon and archaeology on the Chad Export Project. J. Soc. Archaeol. 10:347–66
    [Google Scholar]
  96. Martindale A, Supernant K. 2009. Quantifying the defensiveness of defended sites on the Northwest Coast of North America. J. Anthropol. Archaeol. 28:191–204
    [Google Scholar]
  97. Massey D. 1994. Space,Place, and Gender Minneapolis: Univ. Minn. Press
  98. McGuire RH. 2013. Steel walls and picket fences: rematerializing the US–Mexican border in Ambos Nogales. Am. Anthropol. 115:466–80
    [Google Scholar]
  99. McGuire RH. 2020. The materiality and heritage of contemporary forced migration. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 49:175–91
    [Google Scholar]
  100. McInturff A, Xu W, Wilkinson CE, Dejid N, Brashares JS. 2020. Fence ecology: frameworks for understanding the ecological effects of fences. Bioscience 70:971–85
    [Google Scholar]
  101. McKittrick K. 2013. Plantation futures. Small Axe 17:1–15
    [Google Scholar]
  102. McKittrick K, Woods CA. 2007. Black Geographies and the Politics of Place Boston: South End Press
  103. Meskell L. 2018. A Future in Ruins: UNESCO, World Heritage, and the Dream of Peace Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
  104. Mills BJ, Peeples MA, Aragon LD, Bellorado BA, Clark JJ et al. 2018. Evaluating Chaco migration scenarios using dynamic social network analysis. Antiquity 92:922–39
    [Google Scholar]
  105. Monmonier M. 1996. How to Lie with Maps Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
  106. Montgomery LM, Fowles S. 2020. An Indigenous archive: documenting Comanche history through rock art. Am. Indian Q. 44:196–220
    [Google Scholar]
  107. Mullin D 2011. Border crossings: the archaeology of borders and borderlands. An introduction. Places in Between: The Archaeology of Social, Cultural And Geographical Borders and Borderlands D Mullin 1–12 Oxford, UK: Oxbow Books
    [Google Scholar]
  108. Nägele K, Posth C, Orbegozo MI, De Armas YC, Godoy STH et al. 2020. Genomic insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean. Science 369:456–60
    [Google Scholar]
  109. Oas SE, Hauser MW. 2017. The political ecology of plantations from the ground up. Environ. Archaeol. 23:4–12
    [Google Scholar]
  110. Ogundiran A, Falola T, eds. 2007. Archaeology of Atlantic Africa and the African Diaspora Bloomington: Indiana Univ. Press
  111. Oka RC, Kusimba CM. 2008. Siddi as mercenary or as African success story on the West Coast of India. India in Africa, Africa in India: Indian Ocean Cosmopolitanisms JC Hawley 203–29 Bloomington: Indiana Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  112. Panich LM, Griffin B, Schneider TD. 2018. Native acquisition of obsidian in colonial-era central California: implications from Mission San José. J. Anthropol. Archaeol. 50:1–11
    [Google Scholar]
  113. Parker BJ. 2006. Toward an understanding of borderland processes. Am. Antiq 71:77–100
    [Google Scholar]
  114. Parker BJ. 2012. Geographies of power: territoriality and empire during the Mesopotamian Iron Age. Archaeol. Pap. Am. Anthropol. Assoc. 22:126–44
    [Google Scholar]
  115. Pearson M, Shanks M. 2001. Theatre/Archaeology. London: Routledge
  116. Peluso NL. 1995. Whose woods are these? Counter-mapping forest territories in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Antipode 27:383–406
    [Google Scholar]
  117. Power G. 2012. A European Frontier Elite: The Nobility of the English Pale in Tudor Ireland, 1496–1566 Hannover, Ger.: Wehrhahn Verlag
  118. Purser M 2012. Emptying the magician's hat: participatory GIS-based research in Fiji. The Oxford Handbook of Public Archaeology R Skeates, C McDavid, J Carman 496–512 Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  119. Rankin W. 2016. After the Map: Cartography, Navigation, and the Transformation of Territory in the Twentieth Century Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
  120. Rankin W. 2020. Race and the territorial imaginary: reckoning with the demographic cartography of the United States. Modern Am. Hist. 3:199–230
    [Google Scholar]
  121. Riggs E, Jatt ZR. 2017. The 1947 partition of India and Pakistan: migration, material landscapes, and the making of nations. J. Contemp. Archaeol. 3:139–46
    [Google Scholar]
  122. Rizvi UZ. 2020. Community-based and participatory praxis as decolonizing archaeological methods and the betrayal of new research. Archaeologies of the Heart K Supernant, JE Baxter, N Lyons, S Atalay 83–96 Cham, Switz.: Springer Nature
    [Google Scholar]
  123. Rocheleau D. 2005. Communities in space or situating people and ecologies in place?. Communities and Conservation: Histories and Politics of Community-Based Natural Resource Management P Brosius, AL Tsing, C Zerner 327–62 New York: Altamira
    [Google Scholar]
  124. Ross DE. 2013. An Archaeology of Asian Transnationalism Gainesville: Univ. Press Fla.
  125. Ryzewski K. 2012. Multiply situated strategies? Multi-sited ethnography and archeology. J. Archaeol. Method Theory 19:241–68
    [Google Scholar]
  126. Sayers DO. 2014. A Desolate Place for a Defiant People: The Archaeology of Maroons, Indigenous Americans, and Enslaved Laborers in the Great Dismal Swamp Gainesville: Univ. Press Fla.
  127. Schneider TD. 2015. Placing refuge and the archaeology of indigenous hinterlands in colonial California. Am. Antiq. 80:695–713
    [Google Scholar]
  128. Schneider TD. 2021. The Archaeology of Refuge and Recourse: Coast Miwok Resilience and Indigenous Hinterlands in Colonial California Tucson: Univ. Arizona Press
  129. Schneider TD, Hayes K. 2020. Epistemic colonialism: Is it possible to decolonize archaeology?. Am. Indian Q. 44:127–48
    [Google Scholar]
  130. Schneider TD, Panich LM. 2019. Landscapes of refuge and resiliency: native Californian persistence at Tomales Bay, California, 1770s–1870s. Ethnohistory 66:21–47
    [Google Scholar]
  131. Schroeder H, Ávila-Arcos MC, Malaspinas A-S, Poznik GD, Sandoval-Velasco M et al. 2015. Genome-wide ancestry of 17th-century enslaved Africans from the Caribbean. PNAS 112:123669–73
    [Google Scholar]
  132. Scott JC. 2009. The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia New Haven, CT: Yale Univ. Press
  133. Scott JC. 2017. Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States New Haven, CT: Yale Univ. Press
  134. Seetah K. 2016. Contextualizing complex social contact: Mauritius, a microcosm of global diaspora. Camb. Archaeol. J. 26:265–83
    [Google Scholar]
  135. Silliman SW. 2014. Archaeologies of Indigenous survivance and residence: navigating colonial and scholarly dualities. Rethinking Colonial Pasts Through Archaeology N Ferris, R Harrison, MV Wilcox 57–75 Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  136. Simpson A. 2014. Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States Durham, NC: Duke Univ. Press
  137. Singleton TA 1999. I, Too, Am America: Archaeological Studies of African-American Life. Charlottesville: Univ. Va. Press
  138. Smith AT. 2003. The Political Landscape: Constellations of Authority in Early Complex Polities Berkeley: Univ. Calif. Press349 pp.
  139. Smith AT. 2015. The Political Machine: Assembling Sovereignty in the Bronze Age Caucasus Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press
  140. Smith M. 2005. Networks, territories, and the cartography of ancient states. Ann. Assoc. Am. Geogr. 95:832–49
    [Google Scholar]
  141. Snead JE, Erickson CL, Darling JA. 2009. Making human space: the archaeology of trails, paths, and roads. Landscapes of Movement: Trails, Paths, and Roads in Anthropological Perspective JE Snead, CL Erickson, JA Darling 1–19 Philadelphia: Univ. Pa. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  142. Soto G. 2018. Banal materiality and the idea of sovereignty: the migration funnel effect and the policing of the US-Mexico border, 2000–2016. Polit. Geogr. 66:113–29
    [Google Scholar]
  143. St. John A, Ferris N 2019. Unravelling identities on archaeological borderlands: late Woodland Western Basin and Ontario Iroquoian traditions in the Lower Great Lakes region. Can. Geogr. 63:43–56
    [Google Scholar]
  144. Stewart HE, Ostericher I, Gokee C, De León J. 2016. Surveilling surveillance: countermapping undocumented migration in the USA-Mexico borderlands. J. Contemp. Archaeol. 3:159–74
    [Google Scholar]
  145. Supernant K. 2014. Intervisibility and intravisibility of rock feature sites: a method for testing viewshed within and outside the socio-spatial system of the Lower Fraser River Canyon, British Columbia. J. Archaeol. Sci. 50:497–511
    [Google Scholar]
  146. Tagliacozzo E. 2009. Secret Trades, Porous Borders: Smuggling and States Along a Southeast Asian Frontier, 1865–1915 New Haven, CT: Yale Univ. Press
  147. Texas Freedom Colonies Project 2022. Texas Freedom Colonies Project Atlas (2.1). Texas Freedom Colonies Project https://tamu.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=48f89e0f870c4400a990682a09cf919f
    [Google Scholar]
  148. Van Dommelen P. 2014. Moving on: archaeological perspectives on mobility and migration. World Archaeol 46:477–83
    [Google Scholar]
  149. VanValkenburgh P, Dufton JA. 2020. Big archaeology: horizons and blindspots. J. Field Archaeol. 45:S1–7
    [Google Scholar]
  150. VanValkenburgh P, Osborne JF. 2012. Home turf: archaeology, territoriality, and politics. Archaeol. Pap. Am. Anthropol. Assoc. 22:1–27
    [Google Scholar]
  151. Vizenor G. 2008. Survivance: Narratives of Native Presence Lincoln: Univ. Neb. Press
  152. Voss BL. 2008. The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis: Race and Sexuality in Colonial San Francisco Berkeley: Univ. Calif. Press
  153. Voss BL, Kennedy JR, Tan JS, Ng LW. 2018. The archaeology of home: Qiaoxiang and nonstate actors in the archaeology of the Chinese diaspora. Am. Antiq. 83:407–26
    [Google Scholar]
  154. Wallman D, Oas SE 2020. The environmental archaeology of subsistence and the socioecological landscape at Morne Patate. Everyday Ecologies and Economies of Plantations: Archaeology at Morne Patate, Dominica M Hauser, D Wallman 153–67 Gainesville: Univ. Press Fla.
    [Google Scholar]
  155. Weik TM. 2012. The Archaeology of Antislavery Resistance Gainesville: Univ. Press Fla.
  156. Wilcox MV. 2014. Indigenous archaeology and the Pueblo Revolt of 1680: social mobility and boundary maintenance in colonial contexts. Rethinking Colonial Pasts Through Archaeology N Ferris, R Harrison, MV Wilcox 150–72 Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  157. Wood D. 2010. Rethinking the Power of Maps New York: Guilford Press
  158. Zedeño MN. 2016. The archaeology of territory and territoriality. Handbook of Landscape Archaeology B David, J Thomas 210–17 London: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-101819-110141
Loading
  • Article Type: Review Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error