1932

Abstract

This article brings together classic work in the anthropology of death, much of which focused on funerary rites, with more recent studies, some of which continue with the classic focus and some of which introduce distinct views and problematics. The anthropology of death has become a capacious field, linking to broader debates on violence, suffering, medicine, subjectivity, race, gender, faith, modernity, and secularity (among others). In much of this work, though, we find common concerns with, and recurrent considerations of, certain themes. This review focuses on two of the most important: the symbolic imaginaries of how life conquers death; and, even more centrally, the materiality of death. A range of topics are addressed, including putrescence, burial, bones, commemorations, debts, care, sovereignty, and personal loss.

Keyword(s): deathfuneralsHertzmaterialitythe corpse
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2019-10-21
2024-04-17
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