1932

Abstract

This article is positioned at the intersection of linguistic, medical, and psychological anthropology and reviews scholarship on the communicative processes that constitute moral/ethical care. Varying notions of care have become a leitmotif in efforts to include the analysis of agency and creativity in discussions of the lived experience of marginalization. Understandings of care have in common an emphasis on relationality and activity: Communicative activities of care both constitute and are made relevant by morally/ethically framed relationships with others and oneself. Embodied communication is central in both care activities and the constitution of moral/ethical care. From a phenomenological standpoint, communicative activities of care are simultaneously social action and embodied experience. This article reviews three key themes: () the embodied linguistic constitution of care, () the performance of care, and () exclusion from care. Together, these themes reveal common moral/ethical–aesthetic processes that are shared across diverse social and cultural contexts.

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2018-10-21
2024-06-17
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