1932

Abstract

This review surveys the past 30 years of the anthropology of corporate animal agribusiness, analyzing how various themes embedded in the words of the article's title—industrial, meat, and production—have been taken up by ethnographers of confinement farms and mechanized slaughterhouses. In so doing, it describes how the literature finds the animal life-and-death cycle underlying modern meat to be a hybrid and uneven mixture of industrialisms both old and emerging, at once violent and caring, far-reaching yet incomplete. The review further examines the numerous and distinct ways that scholars have suggested that industrial meat production is an exceptional kind of industrialism: one that requires analytics, ethics, forms of critique, and modes of attention that differ from those developed by studies of other sites of manufacturing.

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2018-10-21
2024-06-22
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