1932

Abstract

This article discusses historical and anthropological approaches to the life of social science. After presenting the thematic of social science concepts that figure as found object in cultural anthropology, this review briefly introduces the domain of history of social science (HSS). It then examines HSS studies that could enrich anthropological encounters with social science concepts, both methodologically and through the vivid social histories of relevant concepts, categories, and methods. I complement my review of these approaches in HSS with a discussion of anthropological studies of social science concepts. I review both the historical and the anthropological literature with the same key questions, focused on the analytical tools that each approach brings to the study of social science: what conditions of emergence of these social imaginaries are incorporated in the analyses, what contexts and processes relevant to their appropriation and travel are presented, and how these enquiries examine the effects on the worlds in which they circulate. In my conclusion, I point out how cultural anthropology can uniquely contribute to the domain of HSS.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-102317-050241
2022-10-24
2024-06-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/anthro/51/1/annurev-anthro-102317-050241.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-102317-050241&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Literature Cited

  1. Andersson J. 2018. The Future of the World: Futurology, Futurists, and the Struggle for the Post Cold War Imagination Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Arzyutov D, Kan S. 2017. The concept of the “field” in early Soviet ethnography, a Northern perspective. Sibirica 16:131–74
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Asad T. 1973. Anthropology & The Colonial Encounter London: Ithaca Press
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Baba ML. 2012. Anthropology and business: influence and interests. J. Bus. Anthropol. 1:20–71
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Baba ML, Hill CE 2006. What's in the name “applied anthropology”? An encounter with global practice. The Globalization of Anthropology NAPA Bull. 25), ed. CE Hill, L Baba 176–207 Washington, DC: Am. Anthropol. Assoc.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Backhouse RE, Fontaine P, eds. 2010. The History of the Social Sciences Since 1945 Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Backhouse RE, Fontaine P, eds. 2014. A Historiography of the Modern Social Sciences Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Bennett E. 2015. Workshops of Empire: Stegner, Engle, and American Creative Writing During the Cold War Iowa City: Univ. Iowa Press
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Bernstein JH. 2015. Transdisciplinarity: a review of its origins, development, and current issues. J. Res. Pract. 11:1R1
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Bogardus ES. 1924. Methods of interviewing. J. Appl. Sociol. 9:456–67
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Brückweh K, Wetzell RF, Ziemann B, eds. 2012. Engineering Society: The Role of the Human and Social Sciences in Modern Societies Houndmills/Basingstoke/Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Buck P. 1985. Adjusting to military life: The social sciences go to war, 1941–1950. Military Enterprise and Technological Change: Perspectives on the American Experience MR Smith 203–52 Cambridge, MA: MIT Press
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Camic C, Gross N, Lamont Ml, eds. 2011. Social Knowledge in the Making Chicago/London: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Capshew JH. 1999. Psychologists on the March: Science, Practice, and Professional Identity in America, 1929–1969 Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Carr ES. 2010. Enactments of expertise. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 39:17–32
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Chomsky N, Nader L, Wallerstein I, Lewontin RC, Ohmann R, eds. 1997. The Cold War & the University: Toward an Intellectual History of the Postwar Years New York: New Press
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Clifford J, Marcus GE, eds. 1986. Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography Berkeley, CA: Univ. Calif. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Cohen-Cole J. 2014. The Open Mind: Cold War Politics and the Sciences of Human Nature Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Collini S. 2012. What Are Universities For? London: Penguin
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Converse JM. 2009. Survey Research in the United States: Roots and Emergence 18901960 New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publ.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Crowther-Heyck H. 2006. Patrons of the revolution. Ideals and institutions in postwar behavioral science. Isis 97:3420–46
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Crowther-Heyck H. 2015. Age of System: Understanding the Development of Modern Social Science Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Cullather N. 2002. Damming Afghanistan: modernization in a buffer state. J. Am. Hist. 89:512–37
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Darnell R. 1977. History of anthropology in historical perspective. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 6:399–417
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Darnell R. 1998. And Along Came Boas: Continuity and Revolution in Americanist Anthropology Amsterdam: John Benjamins
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Darnell R. 2001. Invisible Genealogies: A History of Americanist Anthropology Lincoln, NE: Univ. Neb. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Darnell R. 2011. 2009 Presidential address: What is “history”? An anthropologist's eye view. Ethnohistory 58:2213–27
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Daston L. 2004. Taking note(s). Isis 95:443–48
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Daston L, Galison P, eds. 2007. Objectivity New York: Zone Books
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Dow PB. 1991. Schoolhouse Politics: Lessons from the Sputnik Era Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Dupuy J-P. 2009. On the Origins of Cognitive Science: The Mechanization of the Mind Cambridge, MA: MIT Press
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Engerman DC. 2009. Know Your Enemy: The Rise and Fall of America's Soviet Experts Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Engerman DC. 2010. Social science in the Cold War. Isis 101:2393–400
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Engerman DC. 2015. The pedagogical purposes of interdisciplinary social science: a view from area studies in the United States. J. Hist. Behav. Sci. 51:78–92
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Erickson P. 2015. The World the Game Theorists Made Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Erickson P, Klein JL, Daston L, Lemov R, Sturm T, Gordin MD. 2013. How Reason Almost Lost Its Mind: The Strange Career of Cold War Rationality Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Eyal G, Buchholz L. 2010. From the sociology of intellectuals to the sociology of interventions. Annu. Rev. Sociol. 36:117–37
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Farish M. 2010. The Contours of America's Cold War Minneapolis, MN: Univ. Minn. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Fassin D, Rechtman R. 2009. The Empire of Trauma: An Inquiry into the Condition of Victimhood Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Fassin D, Steinmetz G, eds. 2023. The Social Sciences in the Looking Glass: Studies in the Production of Knowledge Durham, NC: Duke Univ. Press. In press
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Faubion JD. 1993. History in anthropology. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 22:35–54
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Ferguson J. 1999. Expectations of Modernity: Myths and Meanings of Urban Life on the Zambian Copperbelt Berkeley, CA: Univ. Calif. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Flandreau M. 2016. Anthropologists in the Stock Exchange: A Financial History of Victorian Science Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Franklin S. 1995. Science as culture, cultures of science. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 24:163–84
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Furner MO. 2011. Advocacy and Objectivity: A Crisis in the Professionalization of American Political Science1865–1905 New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publ.
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Geiger RL. 1992. Science, universities, and national defense, 1945–1970. Osiris 7:26–48
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Geiger RL. 1997. What happened after Sputnik? Shaping university research in the United States. Minerva 35:349–67
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Giddens A. 1984. The Constitution of Society Cambridge, UK: Polity Press
    [Google Scholar]
  49. Gill L, Turner T, di Leonardo M, Lutz C, Aiyer A. 2010. Commentaries on “Knowledge and empire: the social sciences and United States imperial expansion.”. Identities 17:45–71
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Gillespie R. 1991. Manufacturing Knowledge: A History of the Hawthorne Experiments Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  51. Gluck C, Tsing A, eds. 2009. Words in Motion Durham, NC: Duke Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  52. González RJ. 2010. Militarizing Culture: Essays on the Warfare State Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Goodman JE, Silverstein PA. 2009. Bourdieu in Algeria: Colonial Politics, Ethnographic Practices, Theoretical Developments Lincoln, NE: Univ. Neb. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Gusterson H. 2007. Anthropology and militarism. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 36:155–75
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Guyer JL. 2004. Anthropology in area studies. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 33:499–523
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Hale NG. 1995. The Rise and Crisis of Psychoanalysis in America: Freud and the Americans 19171985 New York: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  57. Halpern O. 2014. Beautiful Data: A History of Vision and Reason Since 1945 Durham, NC: Duke Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  58. Handler R. 1988. Nationalism and the Politics of Culture in Quebec Madison, WI: Univ. Wisc. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  59. Handler R. 2000. Excluded Ancestors, Inventible Traditions: Essays Toward a More Inclusive History of Anthropology Madison, WI: Univ. Wisc. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  60. Handler R. 2004. Significant Others: Interpersonal and Professional Commitments in Anthropology Madison, WI: Univ. Wisc. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  61. Harding SF. 2000. The Book of Jerry Falwell: Fundamentalist Language and Politics Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  62. Hart K, Ortiz H. 2014. The anthropology of money and finance: between ethnography and world history. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 43:465–82
    [Google Scholar]
  63. Heilbron J. 2023. Making sense of globalizing social science. See Fassin & Steinmetz 2023. In press
  64. Heims SJ. 1993. Constructing a Social Science for Postwar America: The Cybernetics Group1946–1953 Cambridge, MA: MIT Press
    [Google Scholar]
  65. Herbert C. 1991. Culture and Anomie: Ethnographic Imagination in the Nineteenth Century Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  66. Herman E. 1995. The Romance of American Psychology: Political Culture in the Age of Experts 1940–1970 Berkeley, CA: Univ. Calif. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  67. Hogness R. 1983. The making of stress Unpubl. Manuscr.
    [Google Scholar]
  68. Hoffarth MJ. 2017. The making of burnout: from social change to self-awareness in the postwar United States, 1970–82. Hist. Hum. Sci. 30:530–45
    [Google Scholar]
  69. Horowitz IL. 1974. The Rise and Fall of Project Camelot: Studies in the Relationship Between Social Science and Practical Politics Cambridge, MA: MIT Press
    [Google Scholar]
  70. Howlett P, Morgan MS. 2011. How Well Do Facts Travel? The Dissemination of Reliable Knowledge Cambridge UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  71. Hsueh Y. 2002. The Hawthorne experiments and the introduction of Jean Piaget in American industrial psychology, 1929–1932. Hist. Psychol. 5:163–89
    [Google Scholar]
  72. Hubble N. 2006. Mass Observation and Everyday Life: Culture, History, Theory Basingstoke/Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan
    [Google Scholar]
  73. Hymes DH. 1999 (1972). Reinventing Anthropology Ann Arbor, MI: Univ. Mich. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  74. Igo SE. 2007. The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  75. Isaac J. 2007. The human sciences in Cold War America. Hist. J. 50:3725–46
    [Google Scholar]
  76. Isaac J, Bell D, eds. 2012. Uncertain Empire: American History and the Idea of the Cold War Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  77. Kaiser D, McCray P. 2016. Groovy Science: Knowledge, Innovation, and American Counterculture Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  78. Kingsberg M. 2019. Into the Field: Human Scientists of Transwar Japan Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  79. Kropp K. 2023. How political commitment delineates social scientific knowledge. See Fassin & Steinmetz 2023. In press
  80. Kuklick H. 2014. History of anthropology. See Backhouse & Fontaine 2014 62–98
  81. Kuper A. 1999. Culture: The Anthropologists' Account Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  82. Kuper A. 2010. Social anthropology. See Fontaine & Backhouse 2010 136–54
  83. Lapp M. 1995. The rise and fall of Puerto Rico as a social laboratory, 1945–1965. Soc. Sci. Hist. 19:169–99
    [Google Scholar]
  84. Larson F. 2021. Undreamed Shores: The Hidden Heroines of British Anthropology London: Granta
    [Google Scholar]
  85. Law J. 2004. After Method: Mess in Social Science Research London: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  86. Law J. 2009. Seeing like a survey. Cult. Sociol. 3:2239–56
    [Google Scholar]
  87. Lee RM. 2011.. “ The most important technique …”: Carl Rogers, Hawthorne, and the rise and fall of nondirective interviewing in sociology. J. Hist. Behav. Sci. 47:123–46
    [Google Scholar]
  88. Lemberg D. 2018.. “ The universal language of the future”: decolonization, development, and the American embrace of global English, 1945–1965. Mod. Intellect. Hist. 15:2561–92
    [Google Scholar]
  89. Lemon A. 2017. Technologies for Intuition: Cold War Circles and Telepathic Rays Berkeley, CA: Univ. Calif. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  90. Lemov R. 2005. World as Laboratory: Experiments with Mice, Mazes, and Men New York: Hill Wang
    [Google Scholar]
  91. Lemov R. 2011. Filing the total human: anthropological archives from 1928 to 1963. See Camic et al. 2011 119–50
  92. Lemov R. 2012. Everywhere and nowhere: focus groups as all-purpose devices. Limn 2:32–35 https://limn.it/articles/everywhere-and-nowhere-focus-groups-as-all-purpose-devices/
    [Google Scholar]
  93. Lemov R. 2015. Database of Dreams: The Lost Quest to Catalog Humanity New Haven, CT: Yale Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  94. Lezaun J. 2007. A market of opinions: the political epistemology of focus groups. Sociol. Rev. 55:Suppl. 2130–51
    [Google Scholar]
  95. Light JS. 2004. Urban planning and defense planning, past and future. J. Am. Plann. Assoc. 70:399–410
    [Google Scholar]
  96. Lockman Z. 2016. Field Notes: The Making of Middle East Studies in the United States Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  97. Mandler P. 2019. The language of social science in everyday life. Hist. Hum. Sci. 32:66–82
    [Google Scholar]
  98. Martin E. 1994. Flexible Bodies: Tracking Immunity in American Culture from the Days of Polio to the Age of AIDS Boston: Beacon Press
    [Google Scholar]
  99. Martin E. 2022. Experiments of the Mind: From the Cognitive Psychology Lab to the World of Facebook and Twitter Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  100. Martin-Nielsen J. 2010.. “ This war for men's minds”: the birth of a human science in Cold War America. Hist. Hum. Sci. 23:5131–55
    [Google Scholar]
  101. Meadows DH, Meadows DL, Randers J, Behrens W. 1972. The Limits to Growth: A Report for the Club of Rome's Project on the Predicament of Mankind New York: Universe Books
    [Google Scholar]
  102. Milam EL. 2013. Public science of the savage mind: contesting Cultural Anthropology in the Cold War classroom. J. Hist. Behav. Sci. 49:306–30
    [Google Scholar]
  103. Milam EL. 2019. Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  104. Mintz SW. 1979. The anthropological interview and the life history. Oral Hist. Rev. 7:18–26
    [Google Scholar]
  105. Mirowski P. 2002. Machine Dreams: Economics Becomes a Cyborg Science Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  106. Mitchell T. 2004. The Middle East in the past and the future of social science. The Politics of Knowledge: Area Studies and the Disciplines DL Szanton 74–118 Berkeley, CA: Univ. Calif. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  107. Morris A. 2015. A Practical Introduction to In-Depth Interviewing London: Sage
    [Google Scholar]
  108. Nader L. 1997. The phantom factor: impact of the Cold War on anthropology. See Chomsky et al. 1997 107–48
  109. Nugent D. 2010. Knowledge and empire: the social sciences and United States imperial expansion. Identities 17:2–44
    [Google Scholar]
  110. Pang L. 2012. Creativity and Its Discontents: China's Creative Industries and Intellectual Property Rights Offenses Durham, NC: Duke Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  111. Pels P. 1997. The anthropology of colonialism: culture, history, and the emergence of western governmentality. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 26:163–83
    [Google Scholar]
  112. Pels P, Salemink O. 1999. Colonial Subjects: Essays on the Practical History of Anthropology Ann Arbor, MI: Univ. Mich. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  113. Pérez A. 2022. Combattre en Sociologues. Pierre Bourdieu et Abdelmalek Sayad dans une guerre de libération (Algérie, 1958–1964) Marseille: Agone
    [Google Scholar]
  114. Platt J. 1983. The development of the “participant observation” method in sociology: origin myth and history. J. Hist. Behav. Sci. 19:379–93
    [Google Scholar]
  115. Pooley J. 2016. A “not particularly felicitous” phrase: a history of the “behavioral sciences” label. Serendipities 1:38–81
    [Google Scholar]
  116. Porter TM. 1995. Trust in Numbers: The Pursuit of Objectivity in Science and Public Life Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  117. Porter TM, Ross D, eds. 2003a. The Cambridge History of Science. , Volume 7:The Modern Social Sciences Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  118. Porter TM, Ross D. 2003b. Introduction: writing the history of social science. See Porter & Ross 2003a 1–10
  119. Price DH. 2003. Subtle means and enticing carrots: the impact of funding on American Cold War anthropology. Critique Anthropol 23:373–401
    [Google Scholar]
  120. Price DH. 2008. Anthropological Intelligence: The Deployment and Neglect of American Anthropology in the Second World War Durham, NC: Duke Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  121. Price DH. 2012. Counterinsurgency and the M-VICO system: Human Relations Area Files and anthropology's dual-use legacy. Anthropol. Today 28:116–20
    [Google Scholar]
  122. Price DH. 2016. Cold War Anthropology: The CIA, the Pentagon, and the Growth of Dual Use Anthropology Durham, NC: Duke Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  123. Raphael L. 1996. Die Verwissenschaftlichung des Sozialen als methodische und konzeptionelle Herausforderung für eine Sozialgeschichte des 20. Jahrhunderts. Gesch. Ges. 22:216593
    [Google Scholar]
  124. Robic MC. 2003. Geography. See Porter & Ross 2003a 379–90
  125. Rohde J. 2009. Gray matters: social scientists, military patronage, and democracy in the Cold War. J. Am. Hist. 96:99–122
    [Google Scholar]
  126. Rohde J. 2013. Armed with Expertise: The Militarization of American Social Research During the Cold War Ithaca, NY: Cornell Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  127. Ross D. 1991. The Origins of American Social Science Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  128. Sapolsky HM. 1990. Science and the Navy: The History of the Office of Naval Research Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  129. Saunders FS. 2000. The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters New York: New Press
    [Google Scholar]
  130. Scott JC. 2009. The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia New Haven, CT: Yale Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  131. Selcer P. 2009. The view from everywhere: disciplining diversity in post–World War II international social science. J. Hist. Behav. Sci. 45:309–29
    [Google Scholar]
  132. Shapin S. 2008. The Scientific Life: A Moral History of a Late Modern Vocation Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  133. Shore C, Mclauchlan L. 2012.. “ Third mission” activities, commercialisation and academic entrepreneurs. Soc. Anthropol. 20:267–86
    [Google Scholar]
  134. Shore C, Wright S 2015. Audit culture revisited: rankings, ratings, and the reassembling of society. Curr. Anthropol. 56:421–44
    [Google Scholar]
  135. Simmons D. 2016. Impostor syndrome, a reparative history. Engag. Sci. Technol. Soc. 2:22106–27
    [Google Scholar]
  136. Simpson C. 1998. Universities and Empire: Money and Politics in the Social Sciences During the Cold War New York: New Press
    [Google Scholar]
  137. Solovey M. 2001. Project Camelot and the 1960s epistemological revolution: rethinking the politics–patronage–social science nexus. Soc. Stud. Sci. 31:171–206
    [Google Scholar]
  138. Solovey M. 2013. Shaky Foundations: The PoliticsPatronageSocial Science Nexus in Cold War America New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  139. Solovey M. 2020. Social Science for What?. Public Funding for the “Other Sciences” at the US National Science Foundation Cambridge, MA: MIT Press
    [Google Scholar]
  140. Solovey M, Cravens H. 2012. Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature New York: Palgrave Macmillan
    [Google Scholar]
  141. Solovey M, Daye C, eds. 2021. Cold War Social Science: Transnational Entanglements London: Palgrave Macmillan
    [Google Scholar]
  142. Stade R. 2014. Emergent concept chains and scenarios of depoliticization: the case of global governance as a future past. Anthropology Now and Next: Essays in Honor of Ulf Hannerz TH Eriksen, C Garsten, S Randeria, U Hannerz 205–40 Oxford, UK/New York: Berghahn Books
    [Google Scholar]
  143. Steinmetz G. 2005. The genealogy of a positivist haunting: comparing prewar and postwar US sociology. Boundary 2 32:109–35
    [Google Scholar]
  144. Steinmetz G. 2017. Sociology and colonialism in the British and French empires, 1945–1965. J. Mod. Hist. 89:601–48
    [Google Scholar]
  145. Steinmetz G. 2018. How and why do we write the history of the social sciences? Institute Letters, Spring. https://www.ias.edu/ideas/steinmetz-history-social-sciences
  146. Steinmetz G 2013. Sociology and Empire: The Imperial Entanglements of a Discipline Durham, NC: Duke Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  147. Stephanson A. 2012. Cold War ground zero. Uncertain Empire: American History and the Idea of the Cold War J Isaac, D Bell 19–50 Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  148. Stocking GW Jr. 1965. On the limits of “presentism” and “historicism” in the historiography of the behavioral sciences. J. Hist. Behav. Sci. 1:211–18
    [Google Scholar]
  149. Stocking GW Jr. 1966. The history of anthropology: where, whence, whither?. J. Hist. Behav. Sci. 2:281–90
    [Google Scholar]
  150. Stocking GW Jr. 1987. Victorian Anthropology New York/London: Free Press/Collier Macmillan
    [Google Scholar]
  151. Stocking GW Jr. 1992. Philanthropoids and vanishing cultures: Rockefeller funding and the end of the museum era in Anglo-American anthropology. The Ethnographer's Magic and Other Essays in the History of Anthropology GW Stocking Jr. 178–212 Madison, WI: Univ. Wisc. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  152. Stocking GW Jr. 1983. Observers Observed: Essays on Ethnographic Fieldwork Madison, WI: Univ. Wisc. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  153. Stoler AL, Gourgouris S, Lezra J. 2020. Thinking with Balibar: A Lexicon of Conceptual Practice New York: Fordham Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  154. Strathern M. 1995. Shifting Contexts: Transformations in Anthropological Knowledge London: Routledge:
    [Google Scholar]
  155. Szanton DL. 2004. The Politics of Knowledge: Area Studies and the Disciplines Berkeley, CA: Univ. Calif. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  156. Tobin J. 1990. The HRAF as radical text?. Cult. Anthropol. 5:4473–87
    [Google Scholar]
  157. Tsing AL. 2005. Friction: An Ethnography of Global Connection Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  158. Turner F. 2006. From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  159. Turner S 1999. Does funding produce its effects? The Rockefeller case. Development of the Social Sciences in the United States and Canada T Richardson, D Fisher 213–26 Stamford, CT: Ablex
    [Google Scholar]
  160. Turner SP, Turner JH. 1990. The Impossible Science: An Institutional Analysis of American Sociology Newbury Park, CA: Sage
    [Google Scholar]
  161. Van Eekelen BF. 2017. Creative intelligence and the Cold War: US military investments in undisciplined thought 1945–1965. Confl. Soc. 3:92–107
    [Google Scholar]
  162. Van Eekelen BF. 2023. The social life of concepts: or, how to study the idea of creativity. See Fassin & Steinmetz 2023. In press
  163. Wallerstein I. 1997. The unintended consequences of Cold War area studies. See Chomsky et al. 1997 195–231
  164. Weidman N. 2021. Killer Instinct: The Popular Science of Human Nature in Twentieth-Century America Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  165. Williams R. 1985. Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society New York: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  166. Wolfe AJ. 2013. Competing with the Soviets: Science, Technology, and the State in Cold War America Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  167. Yeo E. 2003. Social surveys in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. See Porter & Ross 2003a 83–99
  168. Zeitlyn D. 2012. Anthropology in and of the archives: possible futures and contingent pasts. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 41:461–80
    [Google Scholar]
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-102317-050241
Loading
  • Article Type: Review Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error