1932

Abstract

Trehalose 6-phosphate (Tre6P) has a dual function as a signal and homeostatic regulator of sucrose levels in plants. In source leaves, Tre6P regulates the production of sucrose to balance supply with demand for sucrose from growing sink organs. As a signal of sucrose availability, Tre6P influences developmental decisions that will affect future demand for sucrose, such as flowering, embryogenesis, and shoot branching, and links the growth of sink organs to sucrose supply. This involves complex interactions with SUCROSE-NON-FERMENTING1-RELATED KINASE1 that are not yet fully understood. Tre6P synthase, the enzyme that makes Tre6P, plays a key role in the nexus between sucrose and Tre6P, operating in the phloem-loading zone of leaves and potentially generating systemic signals for source-sink coordination. Many plants have large and diverse families of Tre6P phosphatase enzymes that dephosphorylate Tre6P, some of which have noncatalytic functions in plant development.

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2021-06-17
2024-06-22
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