1932

Abstract

Here, we review recent progress in genetic and genomic studies of the diversity of species. In recent years, unlocking the genetic diversity of species has provided insights into the genomics of rice domestication, heterosis, and complex traits. Genome sequencing and analysis of numerous wild rice () and Asian cultivated rice () accessions have enabled the identification of genome-wide signatures of rice domestication and the unlocking of the origin of Asian cultivated rice. Moreover, similar studies on genome variations of African rice () cultivars and their closely related wild progenitor accessions have provided strong evidence to support a theory of independent domestication in African rice. Integrated genomic approaches have efficiently investigated many heterotic loci in hybrid rice underlying yield heterosis advantages and revealed the genomic architecture of rice heterosis. We conclude that in-depth unlocking of genetic variations among species will further enhance rice breeding.

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2019-04-29
2024-07-19
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