1932

Abstract

The two-component system (TCS), which is one of the most evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway systems, has been known to regulate multiple biological activities and environmental responses in plants. Significant progress has been made in characterizing the biological functions of the TCS components, including signal receptor histidine kinase (HK) proteins, signal transducer histidine-containing phosphotransfer proteins, and effector response regulator proteins. In this review, our scope is focused on the diverse structure, subcellular localization, and interactions of the HK proteins, as well as their signaling functions during development and environmental responses across different plant species. Based on data collected from scientific studies, knowledge about acting mechanisms and regulatory roles of HK proteins is presented. This comprehensive summary ofthe HK-related network provides a panorama of sophisticated modulating activities of HK members and gaps in understanding these activities, as well as the basis for developing biotechnological strategies to enhance the quality of crop plants.

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2021-06-17
2024-06-20
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