1932

Abstract

Plant leaves display considerable variation in shape. Here, we introduce key aspects of leaf development, focusing on the morphogenetic basis of leaf shape diversity. We discuss the importance of the genetic control of the amount, duration, and direction of cellular growth for the emergence of leaf form. We highlight how the combined use of live imaging and computational frameworks can help conceptualize how regulated cellular growth is translated into different leaf shapes. In particular, we focus on the morphogenetic differences between simple and complex leaves and how carnivorous plants form three-dimensional insect traps. We discuss how evolution has shaped leaf diversity in the case of complex leaves, by tinkering with organ-wide growth and local growth repression, and in carnivorous plants, by modifying the relative growth of the lower and upper sides of the leaf primordium to create insect-digesting traps.

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2021-06-17
2024-04-19
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