1932

Abstract

It is impossible to do justice in one review article to a researcher of the stature of Christopher Dobson. His career spanned almost five decades, resulting in more than 870 publications and a legacy that will continue to influence the lives of many for decades to come. In this review, I have attempted to capture Chris's major contributions: his early work, dedicated to understanding protein-folding mechanisms; his collaborative work with physicists to understand the process of protein aggregation; and finally, his later career in which he developed strategies to prevent misfolding. However, it is not only this body of work but also the man himself who inspired an entire generation of scientists through his patience, ability to mentor, and innate generosity. These qualities remain a hallmark of the way in which he conducted his research—research that will leave a lasting imprint on science.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-biochem-011520-105226
2020-06-20
2024-06-14
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Literature Cited

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