1932

Abstract

Transcription in several organisms from certain bacteria to humans has been observed to be stochastic in nature: toggling between active and inactive states. Periods of active nascent RNA synthesis known as bursts represent individual gene activation events in which multiple polymerases are initiated. Therefore, bursting is the single locus illustration of both gene activation and repression. Although transcriptional bursting was originally observed decades ago, only recently have technological advances enabled the field to begin elucidating gene regulation at the single-locus level. In this review, we focus on how biochemical, genomic, and single-cell data describe the regulatory steps of transcriptional bursts.

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2020-06-20
2024-04-14
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