1932

Abstract

DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) covalently connect the two strands of the double helix and are extremely cytotoxic. Defective ICL repair causes the bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition syndrome, Fanconi anemia, and upregulation of repair causes chemotherapy resistance in cancer. The central event in ICL repair involves resolving the cross-link (unhooking). In this review, we discuss the chemical diversity of ICLs generated by exogenous and endogenous agents. We then describe how proliferating and nonproliferating vertebrate cells unhook ICLs. We emphasize fundamentally new unhooking strategies, dramatic progress in the structural analysis of the Fanconi anemia pathway, and insights into how cells govern the choice between different ICL repair pathways. Throughout, we highlight the many gaps that remain in our knowledge of these fascinating DNA repair pathways.

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2021-06-20
2024-06-17
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