1932

Abstract

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are responsible for more deaths than any other cause, with coronary heart disease and stroke accounting for two-thirds of those deaths. Morbidity and mortality due to CVD are largely preventable, through either primary prevention of disease or secondary prevention of cardiac events. Monitoring cardiac status in healthy and diseased cardiovascular systems has the potential to dramatically reduce cardiac illness and injury. Smart technology in concert with mobile health platforms is creating an environment where timely prevention of and response to cardiac events are becoming a reality.

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2020-07-20
2024-04-19
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