1932

Abstract

African populations are diverse in their ethnicity, language, culture, and genetics. Although plagued by high disease burdens, until recently the continent has largely been excluded from biomedical studies. Along with limitations in research and clinical infrastructure, human capacity, and funding, this omission has resulted in an underrepresentation of African data and disadvantaged African scientists. This review interrogates the relative abundance of biomedical data from Africa, primarily in genomics and other omics. The visibility of African science through publications is also discussed. A challenge encountered in this review is the relative lack of annotation of data on their geographical or population origin, with African countries represented as a single group. In addition to the abovementioned limitations,the global representation of African data may also be attributed to the hesitation to deposit data in public repositories. Whatever the reason, the disparity should be addressed, as African data have enormous value for scientists in Africa and globally.

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2021-07-20
2024-06-13
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