1932

Abstract

α-Particle irradiation of cancerous tissue is increasingly recognized as a potent therapeutic option. We briefly review the physics, radiobiology, and dosimetry of α-particle emitters, as well as the distinguishing features that make them unique for radiopharmaceutical therapy. We also review the emerging clinical role of α-particle therapy in managing cancer and recent studies on in vitro and preclinical α-particle therapy delivered by antibodies, other small molecules, and nanometer-sized particles. In addition to their unique radiopharmaceutical characteristics, the increased availability and improved radiochemistry of α-particle radionuclides have contributed to the growing recent interest in α-particle radiotherapy. Targeted therapy strategies have presented novel possibilities for the use of α-particles in the treatment of cancer. Clinical experience has already demonstrated the safe and effective use of α-particle emitters as potent tumor-selective drugs for the treatment of leukemia and metastatic disease.

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2018-06-04
2024-06-24
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