1932

Abstract

Gene therapy makes it possible to engineer chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to create T cells that target specific diseases. However, current approaches require elaborate and expensive protocols to manufacture engineered T cells ex vivo, putting this therapy beyond the reach of many patients who might benefit. A solution could be to program T cells in vivo. Here, we evaluate the clinical need for in situ CAR T cell programming, compare competing technologies, review current progress, and provide a perspective on the long-term impact of this emerging and rapidly flourishing biotechnology field.

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2021-07-13
2024-06-18
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