1932

Abstract

Microfluidic devices developed over the past decade feature greater intricacy, increased performance requirements, new materials, and innovative fabrication methods. Consequentially, new algorithmic and design approaches have been developed to introduce optimization and computer-aided design to microfluidic circuits: from conceptualization to specification, synthesis, realization, and refinement. The field includes the development of new description languages, optimization methods, benchmarks, and integrated design tools. Here, recent advancements are reviewed in the computer-aided design of flow-, droplet-, and paper-based microfluidics. A case study of the design of resistive microfluidic networks is discussed in detail. The review concludes with perspectives on the future of computer-aided microfluidics design, including the introduction of cloud computing, machine learning, new ideation processes, and hybrid optimization.

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2020-06-04
2024-07-23
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