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Abstract

Over the past decade, the increased adoption of electroporation-based technologies has led to an expansion of clinical research initiatives. Electroporation has been utilized in molecular biology for mammalian and bacterial transfection; for food sanitation; and in therapeutic settings to increase drug uptake, for gene therapy, and to eliminate cancerous tissues. We begin this article by discussing the biophysics required for understanding the concepts behind the cell permeation phenomenon that is electroporation. We then review nano- and microscale single-cell electroporation technologies before scaling up to emerging in vivo applications.

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2023-06-08
2024-04-20
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