1932

Abstract

The neural retina, at the back of the eye, is a fascinating system to use to discover how cells form tissues in the context of the developing nervous system. The retina is the tissue responsible for perception and transmission of visual information from the environment. It consists of five types of neurons and one type of glia cells that are arranged in a highly organized, layered structure to assure visual information flow. To reach this highly ordered arrangement, intricate morphogenic movements are occurring at the cell and tissue levels. I here discuss recent advances made to understand retinal development, from optic cup formation to neuronal layering. It becomes clear that these complex morphogenetic processes must be studied by taking the cellular as well as the tissue-wide aspects into account. The loop has to be closed between exploring how cell behavior influences tissue development and how the surrounding tissue itself influences single cells. Furthermore, it was recently revealed that the retina is a great system to study neuronal migration phenomena, and more is yet to be discovered in this aspect. Constantly developing imaging and image analysis toolboxes as well as the use of machine learning and synthetic biology make the retina the perfect system to explore more of its exciting neurodevelopmental biology.

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2023-10-16
2024-04-21
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