1932

Abstract

In recent years, thin membrane protrusions such as cytonemes and tunneling nanotubes have emerged as a novel mechanism of intercellular communication. Protrusion-based cellular interactions allow for specific communication between participating cells and have a distinct spectrum of advantages compared to secretion- and diffusion-based intercellular communication. Identification of protrusion-based signaling in diverse systems suggests that this mechanism is a ubiquitous and prevailing means of communication employed by many cell types. Moreover, accumulating evidence indicates that protrusion-based intercellular communication is often involved in pathogenesis, including cancers and infections. Here we review our current understanding of protrusion-based intercellular communication.

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2018-10-06
2024-06-14
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