1932

Abstract

Dwindling fossil fuel resources and substantial release of CO from their processing have increased the appeal to use biomass as a sustainable platform for synthesis of chemicals and fuels. Steps toward this will require selective upgrading of biomass to suitable intermediates. Traditionally, biomass upgrading has involved thermochemical processes that require excessive amounts of petrochemical-derived H and suffer from poor product selectivity. Electrochemical routes have emerged as promising alternatives because of () the replacement of petrochemical-derived H by protons generated in situ, () mild operating temperatures and pressures, and () the use of electrode potential to tune reaction rates and product selectivity. In this review, we highlight the advances in the electrocatalytic hydrogenation and oxidation of biomass-derived platform molecules. The effects of important reaction parameters on electrochemical efficiency and catalytic activity/selectivity are thoroughly discussed. We conclude by summarizing current challenges and discussing future research directions.

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2019-06-07
2024-06-12
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