1932

Abstract

This review compares droplet-based microfluidic systems used to study crystallization fundamentals in chemistry and biology. An original high-throughput droplet-based microfluidic platform is presented. It uses nanoliter droplets, generates a chemical library, and directly solubilizes powder, thus economizing both material and time. It is compatible with all solvents without the need for surfactant. Its flexibility permits phase diagram determination and crystallization studies (screening and optimizing experiments) and makes it easy to use for nonspecialists in microfluidics. Moreover, it allows concentration measurement via ultraviolet spectroscopy and solid characterization via X-ray diffraction analysis.

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2019-06-07
2024-04-22
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