1932

Abstract

Although vaccines have been the primary defense against widespread infectious disease for decades, there is a critical need for improvement to combat complex and variable diseases. More control and specificity over the immune response can be achieved by using only subunit components in vaccines. However, these often lack sufficient immunogenicity to fully protect, and conjugation or carrier materials are required. A variety of protein and peptide biomaterials have improved effectiveness and delivery of subunit vaccines for infectious, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. They are biodegradable and have control over both material structure and immune function. Many of these materials are built from naturally occurring self-assembling proteins, which have been engineered for incorporation of vaccine components. In contrast, others are de novo designs of structures with immune function. In this review, protein biomaterial design, engineering, and immune functionality as vaccines or immunotherapies are discussed.

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2019-06-07
2024-06-13
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