1932

Abstract

In marine industries, the accumulation of organic matter and marine organisms on ship hulls and instruments limits performance, requiring frequent maintenance and increasing fuel costs. Current coatings technology to combat this biofouling relies heavily on the use of toxic, biocide-containing paints. These pose a serious threat to marine ecosystems, affecting both target and nontarget organisms. Innovation in the design of polymers offers an excellent platform for the development of alternatives, but the creation of a broad-spectrum, nontoxic material still poses quite a hurdle for researchers. Surface chemistry, physical properties, durability, and attachment scheme have been shown to play a vital role in the construction of a successful coating. This review explores why these characteristics are important and how recent research accounts for them in the design and synthesis of new environmentally benign antifouling and fouling release materials.

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2019-06-07
2024-04-19
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