1932

Abstract

Bacteria overwhelmingly live in geometrically confined habitats that feature small pores or cavities, narrow channels, or nearby interfaces. Fluid flows through these confined habitats are ubiquitous in both natural and artificial environments colonized by bacteria. Moreover, these flows occur on time and length scales comparable to those associated with motility of bacteria and with the formation and growth of biofilms, which are surface-associated communities that house the vast majority of bacteria to protect them from host and environmental stresses. This review describes the emerging understanding of how flow near surfaces and within channels and pores alters physical processes that control how bacteria disperse, attach to surfaces, and form biofilms. This understanding will inform the development and deployment of technologies for drug delivery, water treatment, and antifouling coatings and guide the structuring of bacterial consortia for production of chemicals and pharmaceuticals.

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2018-06-07
2024-06-19
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