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Abstract

Three-dimensional printing is a still-emerging technology with high impact for the medical community, particularly in the development of tissues for the clinic. Many types of printers are under development, including extrusion, droplet, melt, and light-curing technologies. Herein we discuss the various types of 3D printers and their strengths and weaknesses concerning tissue engineering. Despite the advantages of 3D printing, challenges remain in the development of large, clinically relevant tissues. Advancements in bioink development, printer technology, tissue vascularization, and cellular sourcing/expansion are discussed, alongside future opportunities for the field. Trends regarding in situ printing, personalized medicine, and whole organ development are highlighted.

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2022-06-07
2024-06-16
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