1932

Abstract

We review the impact of control systems and strategies on the energy efficiency of chemical processes. We show that, in many ways, good control performance is a necessary but not sufficient condition for energy efficiency. The direct effect of process control on energy efficiency is manyfold: Reducing output variability allows for operating chemical plants closer to their limits, where the energy/economic optima typically lie. Further, good control enables novel, transient operating strategies, such as conversion smoothing and demand response. Indirectly, control systems are key to the implementation and operation of more energy-efficient plant designs, as dictated by the process integration and intensification paradigms. These conclusions are supported with references to numerous examples from the literature.

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2020-06-07
2024-06-25
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