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Abstract

From the first clinical trial by Dr. W.F. Anderson to the most recent US Food and Drug Administration–approved Luxturna (Spark Therapeutics, 2017) and Zolgensma (Novartis, 2019), gene therapy has revamped thinking and practice around cancer treatment and improved survival rates for adult and pediatric patients with genetic diseases. A major challenge to advancing gene therapies for a broader array of applications lies in safely delivering nucleic acids to their intended sites of action. Peptides offer unique potential to improve nucleic acid delivery based on their versatile and tunable interactions with biomolecules and cells. Cell-penetrating peptides and intracellular targeting peptides have received particular focus due to their promise for improving the delivery of gene therapies into cells. We highlight key examples of peptide-assisted, targeted gene delivery to cancer-specific signatures involved in tumor growth and subcellular organelle–targeting peptides, as well as emerging strategies to enhance peptide stability and bioavailability that will support long-term implementation.

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2023-06-08
2024-04-13
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