1932

Abstract

Regulatory bodies worldwide consider glycosylation to be a critical quality attribute for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG-like therapeutics. This consideration is due to the importance of posttranslational modifications in determining the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties of biologics. Given its critical role in protein therapeutic production, we review glycosylation beginning with an overview of the myriad interactions of glycans with other biological factors. We examine the mechanism and drivers for glycosylation during biotherapeutic production and the several competing factors that impact glycan formation, including the abundance of precursor nucleotide sugars, transporters, glycosidases, glycosyltransferases, and process conditions. We explore the role of these factors with a focus on the analytical approaches used to characterize glycosylation and associated processes, followed by the current state of advanced glycosylation modeling techniques. This combination of disciplines allows for a deeper understanding of glycosylation and will lead to more rational glycan control.

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2020-06-07
2024-06-24
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