1932

Abstract

Magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical applications because of their biocompatibility, tunable surface chemistry, and actuation using applied magnetic fields. Magnetic nanoparticles respond to time-varying magnetic fields via physical particle rotation or internal dipole reorientation, which can result in signal generation or conversion of magnetic energy to heat. This dynamic magnetization response enables their use as tracers in magnetic particle imaging (MPI), an emerging biomedical imaging modality in which signal is quantitative of tracer mass and there is no tissue background signal or signal attenuation. Conversion of magnetic energy to heat motivates use in nanoscale thermal cancer therapy, magnetic actuation of drug release, and rapid rewarming of cryopreserved organs. This review introduces basic concepts of magnetic nanoparticle response to time-varying magnetic fields and presents recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on MPI and conversion of magnetic energy to heat.

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2021-06-07
2024-06-18
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