1932

Abstract

This review presents current theory and empirical research that address the interplay between risk and resilience processes among minority youth in the United States. To move the clinical sciences forward in their research and treatment approaches to solving minority–majority health and well-being disparities, ecological, intersectional, and emic (within-group) approaches must be adopted. We discuss the consequences of systematic oppression and marginalization for children in the United States, focusing primarily on research regarding xenophobia, discrimination, and racism. Lastly, we provide examples of recent interventions that take emic approaches to closing minority–majority gaps in developmental outcomes.

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2020-05-07
2024-06-13
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