1932

Abstract

Tularemia is a Holarctic zoonosis caused by the gamma proteobacterium and is considered to be a vector-borne disease. In many regions, human risk is associated with the bites of flies, mosquitoes, or ticks. But the biology of the agent is such that risk may be fomite related, and large outbreaks can occur due to inhalation or ingestion of contaminated materials. Such well-documented human risk factors suggest a role for these risk factors in the enzootic cycle as well. Many arthropods support the growth or survival of the agent, but whether arthropods (ticks in particular) are obligately required for the perpetuation of remains to be demonstrated. As with most zoonoses, our knowledge of the ecology of has been driven with the objective of understanding human risk. In this review, we focus on the role of the arthropod in maintaining , particularly with respect to long-term enzootic persistence.

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2020-01-07
2024-06-23
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