1932

Abstract

Human activity has facilitated the introduction of many exotic species via global trade. Asia-Pacific countries comprise one of the most economically and trade-active regions in the world, which makes it an area that is highly vulnerable to invasive species, including ants. There are currently over 60 exotic ant species in the Asia-Pacific, with the red imported fire ant, , among the most destructive. Exotic ants pose many economic and ecological problems for the region. Countries in the Asia-Pacific have dealt with the problem of exotic ants in very different ways, and there has been an overall lack of preparedness. To improve the management of risks associated with invasive ants, we recommend that countries take action across the biosecurity spectrum, spanning prevention, containment, and quarantine. The creation of an Asia-Pacific network for management of invasive ants should help prevent their introduction and mitigate their impacts.

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2022-01-07
2024-06-18
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